“Mortified” joins the Mass Poetry Festival

Mass Poetry Festival in Salem, MA Photo: Creative Salem

Would you stand up in a crowded room and read allowed, into a microphone presumably, from your adolescent journal?  That is what people will be doing during Mortified, a new addition to the 8th annual Massachusetts Poetry Festival, which returns to Salem this weekend, April 29 – May 1.

Admission is $20 and includes readings throughout the weekend, admission to the Small Press Fair, Headline Events, and the Slam on Saturday night (as well as Mortified on Friday night).  Some of the events do have a capacity limit, so check the schedule for details and be sure to sign up for events that you don’t want to miss (at least three events are already considered full as this post is being written, so please check the website).

Mass Poetry Festival in Salem MA April 29 - May 1, 2016

Headliners this year include Sandra Beasley, Charles Simic, Mark Doty, Marie Howe, and Ocean Vuong.

For complete information, and to register online, visitMassPoetry.org and follow the festival on Facebook.

Fashion and Vision in Salem on Friday Night

Salem Arts Festival Fashion Show Fundraiser

The Salem Arts Festival is going to light up Old Town Hall with a locally-sourced fashion show on Friday night.  Featuring fabulous fashion from local boutiques including Avalanche Company Store, The Boutique, Lifebridge’s Second Chance Thrift Shop, Modern Millie Vintage & Consignments, Ocean Chic Boutique & Waterbar, RJ Coins and Jewelry, Peabody Essex Museum Shop, and TBT Post, the catwalk will be magically Salem, through-and-through.  Even the make-up is local, being done by the artists at Laura Lanes Skin Care, Rouge Cosmetics, and Radiance Lifestyle Salon.  Buy your tickets online before they sell out!

This is a fabulously fashionable way to support the Salem Arts Festival, which will spin into Salem for the first weekend of June.

The Fashion Show is not the only thing happening on Friday night in Salem. Just down Derby Street near a dark house with many gables, there will be a celebration of one remarkable woman by the name of Caroline Emmerton. A special exhibition, Caroine Emmerton: An Unbound Vision, opens at 6pm with a reception.

Caroline Emmerton Exhibit

One of our favorite members of the (unofficial) “Strong Women of Salem” club, this native of Salem would become one of the city’s most productive and entrepreneurial philanthropists. Among her most important accomplishments was the rescue, restoration and repurposing of the Turner-Ingersoll Mansion, which we now know as The House of the Seven Gables.

What was once the residence of a prominent sea captain and later the home of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s cousin Susanna Ingersoll would become The House of the Seven Gables. In a smart and creative promotional move, Emmerton gave the house — Hawthorne’s inspiration for his novel, The House of the Seven Gables — a new name and a worthy purpose. Proceeds from tours of The Gables would support her Settlement House programs to help the city’s immigrant population settle and gain U.S. citizenship. The Settlement work begun in 1908 continues today, thanks to Emmerton’s prescience and persistence.

2016 marks Caroline Emmerton’s 150th Birthday and the celebration begins on April 8 when the exhibit, An Unbound Vision, opens.  For a complete schedule of celebratory events, visit 7gables.org.

The reception at the Gables begins at 6:00 PM on Friday night, and the Fashion Show at Old Town Hall is at 7:00 PM, which makes it just right to take in both events and support both worthy endeavors.  Hope to see you there!

Historic Burying Grounds

Historic Burying Grounds

Charter Street Cemetery. Photo: Jasmine Gordon

Salem has three cemeteries that are significant to the Witch Trials of 1692. The Howard Street Cemetery is said to be where Giles Corey was taken to be pressed to death, a torture chosen because he refused to stand trial. George Corwin, who served as the high sheriff of Essex County in 1692, and his brother Jonathon Corwin, the Salem merchant who lived in the “Witch House” when he served as magistrate during the trials, are both buried in the Broad Street Cemetery. A white obelisk marks their grave.

The Charter Street Cemetery is the final resting place for at least two members of the Court of Oyer and Terminer, including physician Bartholomew Gedney and magistrate John Hathorne, who was the great-great grandfather of writer Nathaniel Hawthorne. Also buried here is Mary Corey, the first wife of Giles Corey, who died in 1684. Giles’ third wife, Martha Corey, was hanged for Witchcraft during the trials.

These three cemeteries, and the Witch Trial Memorial, which is behind the Charter Street Cemetery, are open to the public from dawn to dusk. We ask that visitors treat the graves with respect, and appreciation for their age and solemnity.

Photo Contest Pick of the Month for March

Salem Photo Contest Robert Mercado_160303

Congratulations to Robert Mercado, whose image, “Sailing Away in Salem,” has been chosen as the Destination Salem Photo Contest “Pick of the Month” for March!

Salem Photo Contest Robert Mercado_160303

Do you have a great picture from your trip to Salem? Submit it to our photo contest! You’ll find the information at Salem.org/PhotoContest.

Salem.org