Welcoming the Tall Ship Eagle to Salem

Coast Guard Eagle Tall Ship U.S. Coast Guard Northeast‎Coast Guard Barque EAGLE visits Salem, Massachusetts

The United States Coast Guard Barque Eagle is sailing toward Salem!  She will arrive mid-morning on Friday, July 29 and she will be in port a Salem Wharf, 10 Blaney Street, until August 1.

Both Schooner Fame and Essex Heritage’s Naumkeag Are planning cruises to welcome the Eagle to Salem on Friday morning.

  • Schooner Fame will be sailing out to meet EAGLE on Friday morning at 7:30 am, returning around 10:00. Cost for this special sail is $20 pp. Call 978-729-7600 if interested.
  • The Naumkeag will depart its dock at Salem Wharf on Friday at 7:15 AM to greet the arrival of the tall ship EAGLE and escort her from Bakers Island into Salem  Harbor. Space for this one-of-a-kind experience is limited to 18 passengers. Purchase tickets here.

Not ready to take to the seas to welcome Eagle?  She will be open for public tours on July 29, 30, and 31.  Click here for information, and follow the visit on Facebook.

EAGLE, also known as “America’s Tall Ship” is the largest tall ship flying the Stars and Stripes and the only square-rigger in U.S. government service. The ship was built in 1936 in Germany, and commissioned as Horst Wessel, one of three sail training ships operated by the pre-World War II German navy. At the close of World War II, Horst Wessel was taken as a war reparation by the United States, recommissioned as the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Eagle and sailed to New London, Connecticut. Eagle provides an unparalleled at-sea leadership and professional development experience for future officers of the U.S. Coast Guard.

A new way to cruise around Salem

Salem Harbor Shuttle

The City of Salem and Boston Harbor Cruises have launched the new Salem Harbor Shuttle as a way to travel around Salem with a ocean breeze and no traffic in site!  Coinciding with the opening of the expanded public docks at Salem Wharf on Blaney Street, the new Harbor Shuttle carries passengers between Salem Wharf (Salem Ferry landing), Winter Island, Salem Willows, and Congress Street near Pickering Wharf.

This is the perfect way to travel around Salem, whether you are trying to get to Salem Willows for Popcorn and Skee-ball, to Salem Wharf for the Salem Ferry or a drink at The Landing, to Waikiki Beach and the walking trails at Winter Island, or to Congress Street to enjoy downtown Salem, being on the water gives the feeling of vacation whether you are exploring Salem from near or far.

Rates

Adult: $7
Child (under 12): $4

Day Pass Adult: $15
Day Pass Child (under 12): $9

Adult Salem Ferry Transfer/Salem Resident: $4
Child Salem Ferry Transfer/Salem Resident: $2

Schedule

Salem MA Harbor Shuttle Schedule

July 19, 1692

Salem MA Witchcraft in Salem Village
Salem MA Witchcraft in Salem Village

Witchcraft at Salem Village.

The Salem Witch Trials of 1692 occurred in such a short amount of time, this being one of the reasons why they are so horrifically famous, and July 19th is no exception to the reasons.

Eight people were found guilty of witchcraft and hanged on July 19th.  Two of the first accused in 1692, Sarah Good and Sarah Wildes, were hanged that day, as well as the only minister to be executed during the trials: the Reverend George Burroughs.  It seems he was not only guilty of being a “witch”, but was overdue in repaying his debts to the Putnam’s; a prominent family in Salem Village whose daughter led the girls responsible for the accusations.  Elizabeth Howe, Sarah Martin, and Susanna Martin had all previously been accused of witchcraft, their charges dropped due to lack of evidence, but, like numerous historians and history books state, reasons or motives for many of the accusations in 1692 were due to politics and land disputes, making accusations about more than just witches.

Martha Carrier was unfortunate enough to land herself in a deathly land dispute with her neighbor, Benjamin Abbott.  After experiencing a disagreement, Abbott suddenly fell ill, and accused Carrier of bewitchment.  Not long after the accusation, he accused her whole family and made them testify against her in court.  She was hanged on July 19th, 1692.

John Proctor, one of the most famous victims of the trials due to Daniel Day Lewis’ film portrayal, was possibly the most outspoken citizen of Salem Village.  He would threaten to beat and whip the afflicted girls, knowing that they were lying and performing theatrics.  This was perilous to Proctor, as soon the girls accused his pregnant wife and then him.  In a final plea for help during this time of mass hysteria, Proctor composed and sent a letter to the Boston clergy asking them to intervene or move the trials to Boston.  This was to no avail for the poor man, as their reply came too late to save his own life, but was helpful in pardoning his wife’s’ and their unborn child’s.

One of the most memorable victims of the trials, was the beloved and pious Rebecca Nurse. A respected woman of Salem Village, Nurse was wrongly accused of witchcraft with no credible evidence against her.  “I am as innocent as the child unborn” stated Nurse.  39 citizens of Salem Village risked their lives in signing a petition to save this innocent woman.  Dismally, Nurse was given false hope, after first being found innocent there were fits and protests from the afflicted girls and townspeople, forcing the judge to order the jury to reconsider their verdict, resulting in her death sentence.

The fate of Rebecca Nurse might have been what sparked doubt in the people of Salem Village. How could this innocent, good-hearted Puritan woman be hanged for a crime she so clearly did not commit? Were these people really witches?

A month will pass before the next execution day. The Salem Witch panic is far from over.

-Margaret Kazan

Aloha Hōkūleʻa!

Hokule'a Sails into Woods Hole, MA

Hokule’a Sails into Woods Hole, MA

Salem will say Aloha to Hawai‘i’s iconic voyaging canoe Hōkūleʻa when she arrives at Salem Maritime National Historic Site on Thursday, July 14. The 62-foot catamaran is in the midst of a multi-year circumnavigation of the globe to raise awareness of Polynesian maritime culture and ocean conservation.

Hōkūleʻa will be docked at Central Wharf at the Salem Maritime National Historic Site and she will be open for public canoe tours on Thursday from 1:00 – 5:00 PM.

A Polynesian voyaging canoe, Hōkūle‘a has been built in the tradition of ancient Hawaiian wa‘a kaulua (double-hulled voyaging canoe). Launched March 8, 1975, Hōkūle‘a (“Star of Gladness”) helped spark a revival of Hawaiian culture and wayfinding and is the iconic symbol of the Worldwide Voyage.

Salem has some remarkable connections to Hawaii via the Peabody Essex Museum, Phillips House, and the House of the Seven Gables.

Salem’s centuries-old connection with Hawai’i may be found at the Peabody Essex Museum (PEM), one of the oldest, largest and fastest-growing museums in the country. Since the museum’s inception in 1799, PEM has collected art and cultural objects from the Pacific Islands and its collection of more than 22,000 works — 3,000 of which are Native Hawaiian — is considered among the most important in the world. Visitors may explore another aspect of Salem-Hawaiian history through an immersive gallery recreation of Cleopatra’s Barge, an opulent 19th century yacht that launched from Salem and went on to become the royal yacht of King Kamehameha II who renamed it Ha’aheo o Hawai’i (“Pride of Hawai’i”).

Historic New England’s Phillips House is offering special tours focused on their Oceanic collection at 1:00pm and 3:00pm on Friday, July 15.  The Phillips House flies the Hawaiian flag to symbolize the family’s connection to Hawaii and passion for Oceanic culture, which goes back to 1866 when Stephen Henry Phillips was the Attorney General for the Kingdom of Hawaii under King Kamehameha V.  The family’s Oceanic collections include hundreds of artifacts, rare books, archives, and images dating from the late 1700s through the mid-20th century.

At the House of the Seven Gables visitors and crew can learn about Retire Beckett through a small exhibit, which  will be on view. The Retire Beckett House, now the Museum Store, was home of shipbuilder Retire Beckett (1753-1851). Beckett has to his credit the yacht Cleopatra’s Barge, which was built in 1817 and visited 16 ports in Europe and North Africa until it was stripped and sold to King Kamehameha II in 1820. A replica of the yacht’s cabins is on display at the Peabody Essex Museum.  On Friday and Saturday the Gables will feature interactive family programming inspired by the canoe’s visit to Salem.

For more information on the Hōkūleʻa , visit Hokulea.com; Salem Maritime National Historic Site: nps.gov/sama; and visiting Salem: salem.org. Join the conversation on social media with @destsalem and tag #SalemMA and #HokuleainSalem.

Follow the Hokule’a visit to Salem Maritime National Historic Site on the Facebook event page!

Friendship of Salem departs for repairs

Salem_History_1797_Friendship

Friendship of Salem left Derby Wharf on July 5, 2016, for a scheduled “haul-out.” The ship has gone to Gloucester where she will be removed from the water for inspections, repairs and routine maintenance.

Friendship  motored out of Salem at high tide on Tuesday, heading to Gloucester where the work will be done by Boothbay Harbor Shipyard and Gloucester Marine Railways Corporation on Rocky Neck in Gloucester, Massachusetts. When all inspections and repairs are complete she will return. The purpose of the estimated 12 week contract is to perform a variety of maintenance, inspection and repair work including:

  • Cleaning, inspection, repairs, and painting of the hull below the waterline;
  • Painting of portions of the hull and attachments above the waterline;
  • Inspection, cleaning and maintenance on propellers, shafts, rudder and other running gear components; and,
  • Repair of a deteriorated hull section on starboard side near the base of the foremast.

Learn more on Facebook and at nps.gov/sama.

Salem.org