Celebrate National Margarita Day in Salem, MA

Looking to celebrate #NationalMargaritaDay in Salem, Massachusetts? Luckily there are plenty of spots around the city serving cool, refreshing margaritas all-year-round.

Classics
For classic margaritas by the waterfront, look no further than Pickering Wharf where The Regatta Pub at the Salem Waterfront Hotel and Suites serves up a Frozen Blue Margarita made with Jose Cuervo, Blue Curacao, fresh lime and blueberries. For another blueberry option, walk just around the corner from the hotel to Sea Level Oyster Bar & Kitchen to try the Blueberry Mistletoe Margarita, a mix of Agavales Tequila, Triple Sec, lime juice, blueberries, basil, simple syrup, and topped with a splash of 888 Blueberry Vodka.

In search of raspberry instead? Try Brodie’s Seaport’s Raspberry Margarita with Cuervo Silver Tequila, Combier Orange Liqueur, agave syrup, raspberry purée, a splash of cranberry, fresh lime juice & sour.

Wicked Margarita, from the Hawthorne Hotel

Prefer citrus to berries? Victoria Station & Vic’s Boathouse have you covered with the Blood Orange Margarita, a tasty mix of Olmeca Altos Tequila, Triple Sec, Blood Orange Juice and fresh lime juice. Howling Wolf Taqueria on the corner of Lafayette and Derby Streets can also help with your citrus craving. Their margarita menu includes La Chupacabra featuring 1800 Silver, Triple Sec, blood orange puree, and a house made fusion.

Also in Pickering Wharf enjoy a classic lime margarita at Longboards Restaurant and Bar, or at Victoria Station & Vic’s Boathouse with a tequila of your choice, Triple Sec, agave, lime juice, orange juice, topped with lemonade, or try Finz Seafood and Grill’s Defa Rita, made with Don Julio Silver Tequila, Cointreau, fresh watermelon, lemon, and lime juice.

Can’t decide on a flavor? Howling Wolf Taqueria has a variety of flavors to choose from including mango, strawberry, blood orange, passion fruit, peach, and pomegranate. Also on the menu is the Skinny Marg, a lower calorie take on a classic lime margarita made with Avion Silver, agave nectar, orange bitters, fresh squeezed lime juice, and topped with soda water.

For a classic margarita closer to Salem Common, try the Wicked Margarita at the Hawthorne Hotel served at both the Tavern on the Green and Nat’s restaurants. The Wicked Margarita is crafted with Pueblo Viejo Tequila 100% Agave, and other flavors of your choice, and can be served in a traditional version or a “beach ready” (light) version. For more margaritas in the downtown area, try Village Tavern in the Museum Place Mall, or Rockafellas on Washington Street.

The Ghost Eater and The Wild Gunman, from Bit Bar

Veggie-infused
For a twist on a classic margarita recipe, try a veggie infused margarita from Opus on Washington Street. Opus offers both the Spinario made with Carrot infused tequila, skinos, aperol, black pepper vodka, lemon, ginger, and the Star People with Carrot tequila, blood orange black tea aperol, grapefruit, toasted pecan bitters.

For a margarita with an extra kick, check out some of Salem’s best pepper-infused margaritas. Opus is also home to the Trance Manual which serves up the spice using Habanero Tequila, Ghost Chili Mezcal, pomegranate, Tempus Fugit Creme de Cacao, cinnamon simple, Aztec chocolate, and angostura bitters. While visiting the Hawthorne Hotel, upgrade your Wicked Margarita to a Wicked Hot Margarita with Tanteo Tequila 100% Agave Infused with Jalapeño.

For a peppery take on a margarita and some classic video games take a walk down Saint Peter Street to Bit Bar for the Ghost Eater. A spicy nod to PAC-MAN, this drink is made with Ghost Pepper-infused tequila, Triple Sec, lemon, lime, pineapple, and lemon/lime soda.

From Derby or Lafayette Street, Howling Wolf Taqueria brings the spice with the Jalepeño Margarita featuring El Jimador Reposado, Triple Sec, fresh lime, muddled jalapeno, agave, and orange bitters. Also on the menu is the Spice Mango Margarita with Don Julio Blanco, Triple Sec, mango juice, Tapatio hot sauce, and wolf fusion topped with lemon/lime soda.

Back on Pickering Wharf, Finz serves up a spicy jalepeño flavor in their Coral Reef, a mix of 1800 Silver tequila, blood orange puree, St. Elder liquer, lemon and lime juice, and muddled jalepeño.

Finished with cinnamon
If you prefer your margaritas come with a dash of cinnamon, downtown Salem has you covered. Bit Bar serves the Wild Gunman, made with Tequila, Short Path Triple Cec, cranberry juice, lemon, lime, and honey with cinnamon sugar rim. Rockafellas is home to the Spiced Cider Margarita featuring Milagro Silver Tequila, Grand Marnier, fresh lemon juice and apple cider, garnished with a cinnamon stick and a sprinkle of cinnamon

Another take on a classic margarita using cinnamon is found back at Howling Wolf Taqueria. The Apple Cinnamon Marg is made with Juarez Gold, Apple Pucker, Fireball, a splash of cranberry, and a cinnamon rim.

Alternating drinks between water and alcohol is always a good idea, as is snacking while tasting margaritas. Wherever you celebrate #NationalMargaritaDay in Salem, be sure to drink responsibly.

Singles Awareness Day in Salem, MA

How does one celebrate #SinglesAwarenessDay in Salem, Massachusetts? By remembering some of our most famous singles from Salem’s history of course. Whether by choice (or not), religious preference, or even sabotage, Salem has seen its share of notable singles over the years:

Reverend William Bentley (1759 – 1819) was someone who today we may refer to as a gossiper, or at the very least a nosy neighbor. Local historians have numerous accounts from his diary which include candid entries where he recorded very opinionated views of his neighbors and events around town. His diary makes note of everything from what the weather was like on any given day, to which of the townspeople had died and how, to his various opinions on the businesses of others around him. Aside from his famed diary, Reverend Bentley is most well-known for his work as the pastor of the East Church from 1783. He was a progressive theologian for the time, who also influential in leading the development of Unitarianism in New England, and in allowing the East Church to promote both political and religious liberalism in Salem.

Susanna Ingersoll, from the The House of the Seven Gables’ collection.

Susanna Ingersoll (1783 – 1858) was born and raised in the historical house we know as the House of the Seven Gables. Susanna inherited a good deal of money and property, including the house, upon the death of her mother in 1811. Susanna proved herself to be extraordinarily astute when it came to business matters. During the war of 1812 when British ships were patrolling off of the coast, ships that Susanna most likely could have spied from her upstairs windows, the new nation attempted to weather its first military conflict. During the years of the war, from 1812 – 1815, when people along the coast were fleeing the threatening British, Susanna purchased an unprecedented 17 properties. By the time of her death at the age of 72, Susanna had purchased, mortgaged, and sold well over 70 properties making her the wealthiest land-rich female in New England. In the 1840s Susanna was determined to be worth $250,000.00, an enormous sum at that time which would translate to several million dollars in today’s values. Wealthy, propertied, and secure in her social status, she was truly one of Salem’s notable women and as she was identified in all of her legal documents, she was Susanna Ingersoll, Singlewoman.

Mary Crowninshield Silbee (1809 – 1887), the daughter of Senator Nathaniel Silsbee grew up in Salem on Daniels Street. Mary was rumored to have been engaged to Nathaniel Hawthorne after she had a portrait painted depicting her with a mysterious hunter who resembled the author. Sophia Peabody, who later married Hawthorne, threatened to “put Miss Mary out of the window” in a letter to her sister, and Hawthorne’s involvement with Mary ended soon thereafter. Though Sophia suffered from crippling headaches, which at first prevented her from marrying, her relationship with Nathaniel Hawthorne moved along much quicker once Mary was no longer an issue.

Mary Crowninshield Silbee. Portrait by Francis Alexander, part of the Harvard Art Museums’ collection.

Frederick Townsend Ward (1831 – 1862) was a Salem-born sailor and military commander whose troops supported the Qing Dynasty during the Taiping Rebellion. He left Salem at the age of 15 when he travelled to Mexico hoping to participate in the war going on there. Shortly after this, he began taking up odd jobs on various ships and countries across the globe before ultimately settling in Shanghai where he was asked to lead a group in the Rebellion. During the Taiping Rebellion, Ward and his troops celebrated numerous victories in their battles overseas and they eventually became known as The Ever Victorious Army. Ward makes our list of Salem’s singles due to his unfortunate death in battle: After suffering (and overcoming) 14 previous injuries, a shot to the abdomen in 1862 ultimately caused the commander’s death.

Rose Hawthorne Lathrop (1851 – 1926), the daughter of Nathaniel Hawthorne and Sophia Peabody, was briefly married to George Parsons Lathrop. After their separation, Rose began to help terminally ill cancer patients who did not have the financial means to pay for treatment. Rose ensured her legacy when she became Mother Mary Alphonsa and founded an order of nuns based on the medical work she had started. Today the Dominican Sisters of Hawthorne, now based in Hawthorne, NY continue to help terminally ill patients who cannot afford their medical care.

Caroline Emmerton (1866 – 1942) was the founder of The House of the Seven Gables Settlement Association. In 1908, she purchased the Turner-Ingersoll Mansion and spent two years renovating the home into a museum. When the museum opened in 1910 she used proceeds from admissions to support settlement work and other programs for newly arriving immigrant families. Some of the settlement house programs she started included medical clinics, citizenship classes, English language classes, and sewing to assist new citizens. The Gables continues to offer educational programming today, and currently holds the distinction of being both a museum and a settlement house, the only organization of its kind in the United States. Miss Emmerton never married and dedicated her entire life to service and philanthropy in Salem.

Salem, MA, House of the Seven Gables

A Hot Chocolate Crawl in Salem, MA

Does the winter weather have you down? Why not warm up with a cup of hot chocolate? Thankfully Salem, Massachusetts is home to plenty of restaurants and shops that serve up traditional and unique varieties of this sweet yet soothing treat.

Classic Hot Chocolate
If you’re just looking to warm up with some chocolate on a cold winter day, and you don’t care for any extra toppings or flavors, there are plenty of restaurants around Salem that serve a plain and simple yet classic hot chocolate. Coming from the Bridge Street Area, stop in at Coffee Time Bake Shop for a warm cup of Hot Chocolate Milk, a smooth, rich, and creamy treat made fresh with Dunajski Dairy chocolate milk, and optional whipped cream.

Hot Chocolate, Tavern on the Green at the Hawthorne Hotel

Moving on to Essex Street, Gulu-Gulu Café offers hot chocolate to-go as well as table-side if you’d rather stay in and warm up. Rockafellas on Washington Street offers another comfortable, indoor setting for kicking back with hot chocolate, as does Red’s Sandwich Shop and Maria’s Sweet Somethings both located just around the corner, off of the Essex Street Pedestrian Mall. Continuing down Essex Street towards Salem Common, The Tavern on the Green inside the Hawthorne Hotel offers a cozy fireside setting in addition to hot chocolate that may be topped with whipped cream by request.

While visiting Pickering Wharf, may your way to the Salem Waterfront Hotel and Suites, where hot chocolate is served out of the Regatta Pub and occasionally in the lobby. Also in Pickering Wharf is Victoria Station and Vic’s Boathouse, which serves classic hot chocolate in a warm, waterfront restaurant.

Hot Chocolate with a Twist
For a twist on traditional hot chocolate, head back up Bridge Street to Coffee Time Bake Shop. Add some spice with Coffee Time’s Mexican Hot Chocolate, which combines traditional hot chocolate with cinnamon and cayenne pepper. While there, try the Peppermint Patty (hot chocolate with a swirl of mint syrup) or the Chocolate Covered Cherries (hot chocolate with a splash of cherry syrup).

Russell Stover Mocha Latte, Gulu-Gulu Cafe

Hot Chocolate with Coffee
For an extra dose of caffeine with your hot chocolate add some coffee to the mix at either Gulu-Gulu Café or Coffee Time Bake Shop. Gulu-Gulu Café’s extensive drink menu includes a number of chocolatey coffee treats like the Russell Stover Mocha Latte with chocolate and coconut, and the White Raspberry Latte with raspberry and white chocolate.

Back at Coffee Time, enjoy the Hot Mocha Delight, made with half House Blend Coffee and half hot chocolate with cream, sugar, whipped cream, and raspberry syrup added upon request. If a cappuccino is what you’re craving, try the Mocha Chino instead, where chocolate syrup is mixed right in with the espresso which is then topped with cocoa powder.

Chocolate Raspberry Tea, Jolie Tea Company

Hot Chocolate for Tea Lovers
If you prefer tea to coffee but are still in the mood for some hot chocolate, look no further than Jolie Tea Company on Essex Street. For a minty tea excursion try the Chocolate Mint tea: Sri Lankan black tea, mint chocolate essence. A take on classic citrus scented tea, the Nina’s Hepburn Blend mixes Sri Lankan black tea, orange peels, chocolate, cream and orange flavors. While in the shop be sure to try the Chocolate Raspberry tea, a decadent blend of black tea, dark chocolate curls, and raspberry pieces.

21+ Hot Chocolate
A stroll back down to Pickering Wharf can lead you back to Victoria Station for their specialty spiked hot chocolate, the Peppermint Pleasure, mixed with Peppermint Schnapps and topped with whipped cream. To add other liquors to the mix, order a classic hot chocolate at any of the bars and taverns (like Gulu-Gulu Café, Rockafellas, The Tavern on the Green, or the Regatta Pub) and mix in a shot of your choice.

Hot Chocolate Mix
One can never have too much hot chocolate on hand at home. To purchase hot chocolate mix to enjoy during your next staycation be sure to visit Milk and Honey Green Grocer on Church Street, which also sells farm fresh and locally produced groceries. If you’re shopping for even more chocolatey treats, head over to Front Street to Maria’s Sweet Somethings, where you can purchase hot chocolate mix along with other delicious treats like candies and cupcakes.

City of Salem Announces Plans for Memorial at Proctor’s Ledge

Proctor’s Ledge Memorial, Martha Lyon Landscape Architecture, LLC.

Last year a team of local scholars and researchers were able to confirm the location where the innocent victims of the Salem Witch Trials of 1692 were executed. Following this discovery, the City of Salem has worked with a number of individuals and organizations to come up with plans for a permanent memorial at this site. The memorial will come to fruition with the help of landscape architect Martha Lyon, local historians, Salem residents, descendants of the victims involved in the Witch Trials, and organizations like the Salem Award Foundation and the Gallows Hill Project Team.

The intended completion of the project is the spring or summer of this year, in order to line up with the 325th commemoration of the Salem Witch Trials. The City of Salem is also currently working towards securing funding efforts for the building and upkeep of the memorial. The clean-up efforts on both Pope Street and Proctor Street along with the memorial’s configuration and building specs have been funded by a Community Preservation Act grant of $174,000.

On the importance of the site as a memorial, Salem Mayor Kim Driscoll states, “Salem is constantly looking to the lessons of its past. Whether it was through the formation of our No Place for Hate Committee and our landmark non-discrimination ordinance, or through the good work of the Salem Award Foundation, the lessons we learn from our history directly inform the actions we take today. Having this site memorialized, especially as we prepared to mark the 325th anniversary of that tragic event, presents an opportunity for us to come together as a community, recognize the injustice perpetrated against those innocents in 1692, and recommit ourselves to the values of inclusivity and justice.”

The memorial’s design is set to feature a downward slope from the ledge where historians believe the executions took place. A stone wall will enclose a circular space towards Pope Street at the bottom of the hill, where the names of the victims will be engraved. Lights will also be projected up from the ground to illuminate each individual name, and an oak tree (symbolic of endurance and dignity) will mark the center of the memorial. Work has already begun on the Proctor Street side of the memorial’s site, where maintaining a safe traffic pattern for visitation has become a priority. Plans are also in development to continue the overall cleanup effort of the site, and devise a plan for the use of plants to create privacy while visiting the memorial.

Salem.org