National Doctors Day in Salem, MA

One of Salem’s earliest known physicians was Samuel Fuller, who arrived in the area then known as Naumkeag in 1629. Captain Endicott took notice of the sickness facing the settlers in Salem, and wrote to the Governor William Bradford to request that a doctor be sent to Salem. Governor Bradford upon receipt of this request sent Dr. Samuel Fuller from Plymouth Colony to Salem in hopes that he would be able to help.

While in Salem, Dr. Fuller was tasked with providing medical care for a number of settlers who all appeared to be suffering from a similar illness. The settlers who had recently arrived in the colony found themselves even more prone to sickness due to their recent crossing from Europe. During these kinds of long voyages, colonists were often crammed into close and unsanitary quarters, with very limited access to foods containing ingredients that are necessary for good health, like Vitamin C.

One likely sickness the colonists experienced due to the lack of Vitamin C in their diets was scurvy, which brought on symptoms like fatigue, weakness, and soreness of the limbs. Those dealing with scurvy would find it extremely difficult to cope with the amount of physical labor that was required of them when arriving in the colony.

Tim Maguire of Salem Night Tour

Though unrelated to his medical work, Captain Endicott noted that Dr. Samuel Fuller’s assistance in Salem allowed for a better understanding between Pilgrims and Puritans, who differed in their religious beliefs and reasoning for traveling to the colony. Puritans sought for a more rigid, “purified” version of the Church of England, while Pilgrims viewed themselves as separate from the Church altogether.

There is little record of Samuel Fuller that suggests why or how he became a physician, however we do know that he was eventually named the “official physician” of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. After treating patients in Salem, Dr. Fuller was requested in Charlestown, where he assisted colonists there who were experiencing similar symptoms.

Today, one of Samuel Fuller’s descendants is still working in Salem. Samuel Fuller is a 12th great uncle to Tim Maguire Jr., who you may spot during your visit to Salem if you embark on a Salem Night Tour or visit Remember Salem at 127 Essex Street.

Another Notable Salem Doctor

In 1692 Dr. William Griggs was called upon to examine the girls who were believed to be afflicted with witchcraft. Upon reviewing their symptoms, he determined there was no medical explanation for what was happening, and that a more powerful entity, like witchcraft, was to blame for their behavior, thus beginning the Salem Witch Hysteria.

Five Remarkable Women of Salem

March is Women’s History Month, and we’re celebrating the women who have contributed to Salem’s history over the years.  This year, 2017, we live in a Salem that has a woman at the helm, Mayor Kim Driscoll; a woman in the State House, Senator Joan Lovely; a woman as the head of the Salem school district, Superintendent Margarita Ruiz; the first woman Chief of Police, Chief Mary Butler; and President Patricia Meservey is leading Salem State University into the future.  Salem is a community that nurtures and encourages strong women.

It is only fitting, as we make history going forward, that we acknowledge and celebrate the women in Salem’s past. This weekend, there will be programs at the House of the Seven Gables, Phillips House Museum, and more.

Five remarkable women have already been named here, and they are the women who are actively building Salem’s future.  Here are four women in Salem’s history whose stories we tell often:

Mary Spencer created the Gibralter, believed to be America’s first commercially produced candy, which is still sold at Ye Olde Pepper Companie.

Caroline Emmerton purchased the House of the Seven Gables, turned it into a museum, and use the profits from the museum to fund her Settlement House, which provided training for immigrant girls, boys, and adults.

Elizabeth Peabody opened the first Kindergarten in America.

Bessie Phillips establish the Stephen Philips Memorial Trust House as a museum to be enjoyed by all, which today is part of Historic New England and the only home on Chestnut Street that is open to the public.

The thirteen innocent women who were hanged during the Salem Witch Trials, accused of practicing witchcraft, are perhaps the inspiration for many of the bright and strong women who have led Salem ever since. We remember Bridget Bishop, Martha Carrier, Martha Corey, Mary Easty, Sarah Good, Dorcas Hoar, Elizabeth Howe, Susannah Martin, Rebecca Nurse, Alice Parker, Mary Parker, Ann Pudeator, Margaret Scott, and Sarah Wildes.

For more information on the historic women of Salem, explore the Salem Women’s History Trail.

Irish History in Salem, MA

St. Patrick’s Day may be over, but there are still plenty of ways to learn about Irish history in Salem, Massachusetts. Take a tour of the Phillips House, where many Irish immigrants have been employed by the Phillips family, or visit The House of the Seven Gables this May for a new live performance based on the life of Irish Catholic indentured servant, Joan Sullivan.

The Phillips House
During the early 20th century, the Phillips family employed a number of Irish servants at their home on Chestnut Street. Like many servants at the time, most of the servants the Phillipses hired were young, white, single females who were either immigrants themselves or first generation Americans.

By 1919, the Phillips House servant quarters were home to three Irish women and a couple of Irish men. The women lived in the servants’ quarters, located on the third floor of the family’s home, while the men lived off the property often with their own wives and families.

The women often took on roles within the home, sometimes caring for children as was the case for Catherine Shaughnessy who was a nursemaid to Stephen Phillips. As Stephen eventually moved out of the home to attend boarding school, Catherine, or “Catty,” continued to work for the Phillips family for 52 years as an assistant and maid.

Men at the Phillips House performed roles outside the home, as was the case for Patrick O’Hara who served as the family’s chauffeur. Patrick was responsible for not only driving the Phillips’ family vehicle but also for its care and upkeep.

Guests may tour the Phillips House between 11:00 am and 4:00 pm on Saturdays and Sundays through May 27. June 1 through October 31 the Phillips House is open for tours Tuesday through Saturday. Tours begin every half hour with the last tour at 4:00 pm.

The House of the Seven Gables
The House of the Seven Gables will be introducing a theatrical tavern experience in May called: I Am Joan Sullivan. This experience will give visitors a chance to learn about Joan Sullivan, the Irish Catholic indentured servant of merchant John Turner, who built The House of the Seven Gables in 1668, and her new master, turbulent Quaker merchant Thomas Maule, as she sues for her freedom from his alleged abuse.

I am Joan Sullivan will explore the trials of a young immigrant woman with little to no agency in America where she was considered a second class citizen because of her ethnicity, gender, and faith, long before the immigrant struggle of the 19th and 20th centuries that inspired The Gables’ founder, Caroline Emmerton, in her original settlement mission. For tickets ($10-17) and information, visit www.7gables.org.

Pet Friendly Salem, MA

Belle and Tipper Salem 2011_Barb Swartz

Planning a visit to Salem, MA with your entire family (pets included)? There are plenty of ways to experience Salem with your pet, from pet-friendly hotel rooms to outdoor dining opportunities. Click here for a complete list of pet-friendly locations around Salem.

Accommodations
Many of Salem’s hotels and inns welcome guests traveling with pets. Please note that fees vary by each location, and pet friendly rooms are based on availability.

The Hawthorne Hotel offers pet friendly rooms on the building’s 6th floor. A stay includes complimentary toys for guests’ dogs, and a specially crafted Doggy Room Service menu designed by the Hawthorne Hotel’s executive chef.

Pets are also welcome in select rooms at the Salem Inn, and the Stepping Stone Inn where guests may take advantage of dog walking services for an additional fee.

Guests planning to camp in Salem can bring pets to Winter Island Park which is open from May 20 to November 1.

Attractions & Tours
Well-behaved pets are able to join their humans on some of Salem’s walking tours included Bewitched After Dark Walking Tours and Spellbound Tours. Dogs can also learn about Salem’s history and get around town aboard the Salem Trolley and Mahi Cruises.

Belle and Tipper Salem 2011_Barb Swartz

Belle and Tipper, Image: Barb Swartz.

Shopping
Coon’s Cards & Gifts is home to Penelope’s Pet Boutique, which stocks collars, toys, tags, and treats for their furry friends. Pets may also visit New England Dog Biscuit Company, which bakes natural dog biscuits right in the shop and carries other natural treats and food, toys, collars/leashes, and more for both cats and dogs.

Pets are also welcome in some shops around town, like RJ Coins and Jewelry where guests with friendly pets may browse products like the Dog Fever and Cat Fever hug rings. Other local businesses may place water bowls outside their entrances to keep pets hydrated while they enjoy Salem with their families.

Dining
Local restaurants with outdoor dining spaces may allow pets to join their guests on patios. Flying Saucer Pizza Company, Gulu-Gulu Café, Village Tavern, and Victoria Station and Vic’s Boathouse all welcome pets in their patio dining areas. Village Tavern can also provide a puppy friendly menu and beef infused water.

Walking Locations
Some favorite dog walking spots in Salem include: Derby Wharf, Forest River Park, Salem Common, Salem Willows, and Winter Island Park. Remember to obey local leash laws and pick up after your pet while going for walks. Be sure to bring your pet’s proper identification and proof of Rabies vaccination while traveling, and follow posted regulations when walking along beaches.

10th Annual Salem Film Fest

Salem Film Fest is one of the largest documentary film festivals in New England, and it has been featuring exceptional works of film for the past ten years. This year’s event will showcase over fifty documentaries and shorts between March 2-9.

Films are chosen to be a part of Salem Film Fest based on their technical and artistic grandeur and their abilities to incite new interests and responses from the audience. Additionally, two out of three filmmakers involved in producing the works shown during Salem Film Fest attend related events and speaking engagements throughout the week.

Salem Film Fest begins tomorrow evening with the event’s opening gala at the Hawthorne Hotel. The gala will celebrate the accomplishments of Salem Film Fest in New England, and honor David Fanning, Founder and Executive Producer at Large of FRONTLINE. David will be in attendance to receive the Salem Film Fest Storyteller Award.

Proceeds from the opening gala will be used to support Salem Film Fest, an organization which is maintained entirely by volunteers who have passions for documentary filmmaking.

This year’s Film Fest will present a variety of topics. From After Spring, which follows two families as they search for a permanent home from their temporary stay at a refugee camp in Jordan, to First Lady of the Revolution, which portrays the fascinating life of Henrietta Boggs, the Alabama native who eventually becomes First Lady of Costa Rica. The complete schedule of films and events may be viewed at SalemFilmFest.com/2017/Schedule.

Films will be shown at the Morse Auditorium at the Peabody Essex Museum, CinemaSalem, and the Salem Regional Visitors Center. Tickets are $11-13 per film, and may be purchased online in advance through the Salem Film Fest website.

In addition to the films, Salem Film Fest includes film after parties, lectures, five-minute student film contests, and live music. Complete event schedules for Salem Film Fest are available online at SalemFilmFest.com.

Salem.org