Women with Guts

Salem Horror Fest partners with Rue Morgue Magazine to celebrate women in horror for the New England premiere of SXSW hit Tragedy Girls!

The screening will be paired with Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood followed by a post-credit Q&A with the film’s stars Lar Park Lincoln and man behind the mask, Kane Hodder (Jason Voorhees) moderated by The Faculty of Horror hosts Andrea Subissati and Alexandra West.

The celebration will also feature a reading by FunDead Publications, comedy by Kylie Alexander, and a midnight paranormal investigation with Shari Marie DeBenedetti from Syfy Channel’s Ghost Hunters (admission to investigation sold separately).

Rue Morgue Library’s Women With Guts: Horror Heroines From Film, TV, and Print is now available for pre-order.

9th Annual Salem Arts Festival

The Salem Arts Festival returns for its ninth year with a weekend full of family-friendly programming devoted to the arts in our community. The event kicks off at 6:00 pm on Friday June 2 with viewings of art in Old Town Hall and live music outside in Derby Square. The rest of the Festival will be located throughout Derby Square, Artists’ Row, Front Street, and within Old Town Hall and will feature live musical performances, belly dancing, public art projects, a vibrant street fair and more.

 

The festival celebrates various art forms and gives attendees of all ages creative ways to create art. Featured art styles will include but are not limited to painting, photography, sculpture, installation, dance, music, writing, film, new media, performance, theater, poetry, culinary, and visual art. Also planned for the event are local food pop-ups, a mural slam, and vendors specializing in handmade, locally sourced, and ethically crafted goods.

The Salem Arts Festival will also celebrate this year’s featured community art project: Tidal Shift. As part of Tidal Shift, the Salem Sound Watershed community created jellyfish made out of recycled plastic bags that have been installed over Front Street. Tidal Shift also serves to increase awareness of how single-use plastic bags can impact marine life, like sea turtles who often mistake floating plastic bags for jellyfish, which make up a significant part of their diets. The project comes with perfect timing as Salem is currently moving away from using single-use plastic bags in instances where reusable bags could be used instead.

The Salem Arts Festival is organized by Salem Main Streets, and would not be possible without the generous support of sponsors and volunteers. The Salem Arts Festival is just one part of Salem Main Street’s effort to promote Salem’s downtown neighborhood as a destination for attractions, community projects, dining, shopping, and cultural events throughout the year. For more information about the Salem Arts Festival visit SalemArtsFestival.com or follow the event on Facebook.

Still Small Theatre Presents: Shakespeare’s “Measure for Measure”

“Pay-What-You-Can” Admission
Suggested Donation: $12-18 general, $5-7 senior/student
Proceeds help stop domestic violence in our community.

Measure for Measure follows Isabel, a novice preparing to take her vows as a nun, whose life is thrown into chaos when her brother is sentenced to death for fornication. As she pleads for his pardon, she finds that not only is mercy more complicated than it seems, but that the world around her is more corrupt and dangerous than anyone dreamed.

Please note that due to the difficult and often disturbing subject matter of this play, it may be triggering for survivors of abuse or assault, and we are not recommending it for children.
For more information, see stillsmalltheatre.com or contact stillsmalltheatre@gmail.com.

Play will take place outside in Derby Square, with Old Town Hall as a rain location.

Accidentally on Purpose Improv Comedy

Looking for a creative and hilarious evening of comedy? Accidentally on Purpose Comedy Improv Troupe will improvise a laughter-filled night at CinemaSalem, One East India Square in Salem, on Thursday, April 20 at 8:30 pm.

The unique AOP style is similar to the hit TV show “Who’s Line Is It Anyway” and is complete with audience interaction!  Come and be prepared to offer suggestions for the group, then sit back, watch the laughter and madness ensue as the troupe puts your suggestions to work in hilarious improvisational scenes.

Audience members contribute ideas and suggestions to the troupe, and (only if they desire) can also join the comedians onstage to participate. The results are unpredictable, timely, high-risk, and often brilliant!

This R-rated comedy evening will feature the talented local improv troupe, lots of funny scenes and just plain fun!  Doors open at around 8:00 pm  Tickets cost $16 and may be purchased at CinemaSalem or www.CinemaSalem.com.

“Snow Monkey” Film Showing

Visit CinemaSalem for a showing of Snow Monkey as part of Salem Film Fest.

Tickets ($11-13) may be purchased online in advance.

Renowned Australian artist and filmmaker George Gittoes recruits war-damaged children and their street gangs to shoot local Pashto-style films in Jalalabad, one of Afghanistan’s most violent cities. A vivid and startling portrait, especially of the razor-wielding Gangster capo ten-year-old Steel, who is terrifying to the core, but still capable of experiencing aspects of the childhood seemingly taken from him.

WARNING: Contains some violent and graphic scenes. May not be suitable for all audiences.

George Gittoes directed THE MISCREANTS OF TALIWOOD, which screened at SFF 2011.

Clybourne Park by Bruce Norris

A spin-off of Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun, this razor-sharp satire takes a jab at race and real estate in a fictional Chicago neighborhood. Bruce Norris’ play Clybourne Park which won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for drama and the 2012 Tony Award for best play, overflows with dirty words. None seem filthier in context, however, than “tribes,” “territory,” “property,” “society” and “community,” which are burdened with the intersecting stories of race and class in this country. Clybourne Park is both satirical and deeply troubling as it provides an emotionally raw look at race in America where everything and nothing seems to change.

This production is NOT appropriate for young children. www.salemstatetickets.com or 978.542.6365

$15 general/ $10 students and seniors/ Salem State students free with ID

Frontline Presents a Sneak Peek of “Last Days of Solitary”

Visit the Morse Auditorium at the Peabody Essex Museum for a sneak peek of Last Days of Solitary as part of Salem Film Fest.

Tickets ($11-13) may be purchased online in advance.

FILMMAKER IN ATTENDANCE – Follow what happens to recently released prisoners when they go from solitary to the streets. With extraordinary access to the Maine State Prison, the film examines the long-term effects of solitary confinement and efforts to reduce its use.

WARNING: Contains violent and graphic scenes of prison life. May not be suitable for all audiences.

“League of Exotique Dancers” Film Showing

Visit CinemaSalem for a showing of League of Exotique Dancers as part of Salem Film Fest.

Tickets ($11-13) may be purchased online in advance.

Eight unforgettable Burlesque Hall of Fame inductees peel off the layers of glamor and glitter
for a “backstage tour” of the golden age of stripping they created and sustained. With bawdy
good humor and insight, these articulate Legends share their personal stories with words as
uninhibited and captivating as their routines.

Clybourne Park by Bruce Norris

A spin-off of Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun, this razor-sharp satire takes a jab at race and real estate in a fictional Chicago neighborhood. Bruce Norris’ play Clybourne Park which won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for drama and the 2012 Tony Award for best play, overflows with dirty words. None seem filthier in context, however, than “tribes,” “territory,” “property,” “society” and “community,” which are burdened with the intersecting stories of race and class in this country. Clybourne Park is both satirical and deeply troubling as it provides an emotionally raw look at race in America where everything and nothing seems to change.

This production is NOT appropriate for young children. www.salemstatetickets.com or 978.542.6365

$15 general/ $10 students and seniors/ Salem State students free with ID

Clybourne Park by Bruce Norris

A spin-off of Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun, this razor-sharp satire takes a jab at race and real estate in a fictional Chicago neighborhood. Bruce Norris’ play Clybourne Park which won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for drama and the 2012 Tony Award for best play, overflows with dirty words. None seem filthier in context, however, than “tribes,” “territory,” “property,” “society” and “community,” which are burdened with the intersecting stories of race and class in this country. Clybourne Park is both satirical and deeply troubling as it provides an emotionally raw look at race in America where everything and nothing seems to change.

This production is NOT appropriate for young children. www.salemstatetickets.com or 978.542.6365

$15 general/ $10 students and seniors/ Salem State students free with ID

“The Man Who Saw Too Much” Film Showing

Visit CinemaSalem for a showing of The Man Who Saw Too Much as part of Salem Film Fest.

Tickets ($11-13) may be purchased online in advance.

Is Mexican tabloid photographer Enrique Metinides, obsessed with hyper-violent crime scenes
and accidents, a journalist, paparazzi or artist? Filmmaker Trisha Ziff explores the complexities of this fascinating man who spent over 50 years as a tabloid photographer and whose boyhood exposure to horror led to his discovery that the fate of others was his way of connecting to life.
WARNING: Contains some graphic images. May not be suitable for all audiences.

Salem.org