April Vacation Poetry Workshop for Kids

Celebrate Nathaniel Hawthorne and National Poetry Month! Join the Witch City Writers to dissect Hawthorne’s poem “The Ocean” and learn a bit about how to write a poem. Get inspired by the view of Salem Harbor from the House of the Seven Gables and then try your best to come up with a tongue-twisting, ocean-themed poem of your own.

This April Vacation event will also include and lesson about our local oceans with Greater Atlantic Region Fisheries educators from Gloucester.

Light snacks will be provided.

This event is $5/child or $10/family. The workshop is free for household members of The Gables and for members of the Witch City Writers.

Click here to reserve a place for your family.  For more information, email jarrison@7gables.org, or call 978-744-0991 ext. 152.

Meet the Past: A Walk with Nathaniel Hawthorne

Join Nathaniel Hawthorne, as portrayed by historian Rob Velella, for a walk around Salem. Learn about the places where Hawthorne lived, worked, and raised his family. See the places that inspired some of his most famous works.

There will be two tours: 10:00 – 11:30 A.M. and 1:00 – 2:30 P.M. The cost for the general public is $15. The cost for members of The Gables is $10.

Advance tickets will be available in January 2018. For more information about this event, email jarrison@7gables.org or call 978-744-0991 ext. 152.

“These Walls Do Talk” Exhibit Opening at the Gables

Join us for the opening of our annual exhibit, These Walls Do Talk. The 2018 exhibit shares the science and history about how we know what we know about the 350-year-old Turner-Ingersoll Mansion including analysis of paint, wallpaper, and architecture and primary source documents such as deeds and drawings.

The exhibit opening is an open house event. Join us to raise a glass in celebration of the 350th anniversary of The House of the Seven Gables.

This event is free and open to the public. Click here to RSVP.

For more information email jarrison@7gables.org or call 978-744-0991 ext. 152.

Women’s History Day at the Gables

The House of the Seven Gables will commemorate Salem Women’s History Day with a special women’s history tour and two lectures focusing on the role of women in preservation.

All events are free for members and Salem residents. Regular admission for the general public includes a tour and admission to both lectures. Space is limited for all events. Click here to register. For more information email jarrison@7Gables.org or call 978-744-0991 ext. 152.

12:00 – 12:45 p.m. Women’s history focused tour of The Gables

1:00 – 1:45 p.m. “My Patriotic Duty” – Women and the Preservation of Old South Meeting House Boston

When Boston’s iconic Old South Meeting House was threatened with imminent demolition in 1876, public outrage ensued. A group of Boston area women, led by philanthropist Mary        Hemenway, became the driving force behind the building’s successful preservation. The “20 women of Boston,” as this group came to be known, organized fundraisers to secure a mortgage and then ensure the building’s ongoing preservation and future security. Women involved with ongoing preservation efforts in the 1870s-1880s included author Louisa May Alcott, and even Mary Tyler of “Mary Had a Little Lamb” fame. Erica Lindamood, director of education at Old South Meeting House, will share highlights from this colorful historic preservation success story, and consider Hemenway’s claim that her advocacy for the building was her “patriotic duty” in light of 19th-century politics and social history.

2:00 – 2:45 p.m. The Tireless Traditionalist: Mary Harrod Northend and “Old Salem”, 1904-1926.

One of Salem’s most entrepreneurial representatives of the Colonial Revival movement was Salem-born author and entrepreneur Mary Harrod Northend (1850-1926), who wrote 11 books and countless magazine articles from 1904 until her accidental death in 1926, advancing an earnest and idealistic vision of New England in general, and “Old Salem” in particular, as style sources for the present and future.

3:00 – 3:45 Women’s history focused tour of The Gables

Events will be ongoing at the Witch House and the Phillips House Museum. Please visit their websites for details. 

Salem Women’s History Day at the Phillips House

Join the Phillips House staff for a day of special guided tours focusing on the role of women at 34 Chestnut Street through the years.

Free to Historic New England members and Salem residents.
$5 nonmembers

Tours are available on the half-hour. Registration is recommended. Please call 978-744-0440 for more information.

Museums Celebrate Women’s History Day

The House of the Seven Gables joins the City of Salem in celebrating the notable roles women have played in the region’s history. Salem Mayor Kimberly Driscoll proclaimed March 25, 2018, Salem Women’s History Day. Special programs will be held at The House of the Seven Gables, the Phillips House Museum and the Witch House.

 

Women's History Day

The House of the Seven Gables, the Phillips House Museum, and the Witch House celebrate Women’s History Month on March 25. This portrait was taken in Salem in 1904 in the North End.

The House of the Seven Gables

Events at The Gables include two special house tours and two lectures, each taking up aspects of women’s roles in historic preservation. The Gables’ events are scheduled for Sunday, March 25, from 12 to 3 p.m. Programs are free for members and Salem residents. A fee of $15 grants nonmembers access to one of the special house tours and admission to both lectures. Space is limited for all events.

12 to 12:45 P.M. — HOUSE TOUR
A special tour of The Gables focuses on some of the more significant ways women have influenced the history of the region and this National Historic Landmark property.

1 to 1:45 P.M. — LECTURE
My Patriotic Duty — Women and the Preservation of Old South Meeting House, Boston
The public reacted with outrage when Boston’s iconic Old South Meeting House was threatened with demolition in 1876. A group of Boston-area women, led by philanthropist Mary Hemenway, became the driving force behind the building’s successful preservation. The “20 women of Boston,” as this group came to be known, organized fundraisers to secure a mortgage and ensure the building’s preservation and security. Among the women involved with preservation in the 1870s to the 1880s were author Louisa May Alcott and Mary Tyler, who wrote “Mary Had a Little Lamb.” Erica Lindamood, director of education at Old South Meeting House, will share highlights from this colorful historic preservation success story. She will address Hemenway’s claim that advocacy for the building was her patriotic duty in light of 19th-century politics and social history.

2 to 2:45 P.M. — LECTURE
The Tireless Traditionalist: Mary Harrod Northend and Old Salem, 1904 – 1926.
Donna Seger, Ph.D., chair of the History Department at Salem State University and author of the Streets of Salem blog, presents a fascinating lecture about one of Salem’s most entrepreneurial representatives of the Colonial Revival movement. Salem-born author Mary Harrod Northend (1850 – 1926) wrote 11 books and scores of magazine articles between 1904 and her untimely death in 1926. She advanced an earnest, idealistic vision of New England and “Old Salem” that still serves as a reference point for style and historic depictions of the region’s culture.

3 to 3:45 P.M. — HOUSE TOUR
A special tour of The Gables focuses on some of the more significant ways women have influenced the history of the region and this National Historic Landmark property.

Phillips House Museum

The Phillips House staff will lead special guided tours that explore the role of women through the years at the 34 Chestnut St. museum. Tours begin on the half-hour and run from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The last tour begins at 3 p.m. Admission is $5 for the public; free for Salem residents and Historic New England members.

Witch House

The Witch House presents an exhibition on Anne Bradstreet, America’s first published poet. Bradstreet sailed into Salem with the Winthrop Fleet in 1630. The public is invited to view the exhibition and tour the Witch House at 310½ Essex St., from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Guided tours are $10.25 and self-guided tours are $8.25. The exhibition and tours are free for Salem residents.

About The House of the Seven Gables Settlement Association

The mission of The House of the Seven Gables Settlement Association is to preserve The Gables’ National Historic Landmark and leverage its power as an icon of American culture to engage diverse audiences and provide educational opportunities for the local immigrant community. For more information visit www.7gables.org.

In 2018, The House of the Seven Gables celebrates a singular milestone. Built 350 years ago, it is still a place where stories are made. Ever the provider of shelter and support, The House of the Seven Gables inspires us as it once inspired Nathaniel Hawthorne. Where sea captains once found their footing, immigrants become citizens, visitors explore period rooms, historians pore over archives, children frolic in the gardens, and authors find inspiration. Celebrate this milestone with us and make your own stories at The House of the Seven Gables.

Event on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/events/1823500760994818/

Event on Gables’ website:
https://7gables.org/event/salem-womens-history-day-gables/

A Celebration of Food at The House of the Seven Gables

How do you celebrate 350 years of history? With a Salem Food Tour, of course! Meet at The House of the Seven Gables for a 17th-century food demonstration. Continue down Derby Street and through historic Salem sampling delicious offerings around town while learning about the unique connections to spices, rum, trade, and more.

Proceeds from the tour will benefit preservation and education programs at The House of the Seven Gables.

To reserve your spot for this lecture ($60) please visit www.salemfoodtours.com/reservations and request March 18 in the online form. For questions please call 978-744-0991 ext. 152.

Irish History in Salem, MA

To learn about Irish history in Salem, Massachusetts, visit the Phillips House for The Irish Experience on March 17.

During the early 20th century, the Phillips family employed a number of Irish servants at their home on Chestnut Street. Like many servants at the time, most of the servants the Phillipses hired were young, white, single females who were either immigrants themselves or first generation Americans.

By 1919, the Phillips House servant quarters were home to three Irish women and a couple of Irish men. The women lived in the servants’ quarters, located on the third floor of the family’s home, while the men lived off the property often with their own wives and families.

The women often took on roles within the home, sometimes caring for children as was the case for Catherine Shaughnessy who was a nursemaid to Stephen Phillips. As Stephen eventually moved out of the home to attend boarding school, Catherine, or “Catty,” continued to work for the Phillips family for 52 years as an assistant and maid.

Men at the Phillips House performed roles outside the home, as was the case for Patrick O’Hara who served as the family’s chauffeur. Patrick was responsible for not only driving the Phillips’ family vehicle but also for its care and upkeep.

In addition to special events like The Irish Experience, guests may tour the Phillips House between 11:00 am and 4:00 pm Tuesday through Saturday beginning May 1 and running through October 31. Tours begin every half hour with the last tour at 4:00 pm.

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with live music, traditional corned beef dinners, and more throughout downtown Salem this Saturday, March 17. Click here to view a complete list of this year’s St. Patrick’s Day events.

 

The Irish Experience at the Phillips House

What did it take to keep Phillips House running smoothly? Get a glimpse of the daily duties and living quarters of the Phillips family’s Irish domestic staff at this well-appointed home. Hear the stories of cook Bridget Durkin, waitress Delia Cawley, and nursemaid Catherine Shaughnessy and see where they lived as it looked in 1919. Space is limited.

$15 Historic New England members
$20 nonmembers

Registration is required. Please call 978-744-0440 for more information or see website.

Book Panel with the Authors of Images of America: The House of the Seven Gables

Join Ryan Conary, David Moffat, and Everett Philbrook for an in-depth conversation about their findings while writing Images of America: The House of the Seven Gables. Learn about the new information this team of authors discovered about the history of the house as well as the secret stories behind some of the rare photographs featured in the book. Copies of the book will be available in the Museum Store before and after the lecture.

Members: Free

Non-Members: $10.00

To reserve your spot for this panel please click here ; email groups email groups@7gables.org, or call 978-744-0991 ext. 152.

Salem, MA Military History

“Salem has a rich military history that stretches all the way back to the Seventeenth Century, and continues on today. Salem’s designation in 2013 as the birthplace of the National Guard, and Salem’s privateer connections get most of the military heritage attention, but there is much more to this story.

Salem Common was “Ye Olde Training Field” when Captain John Endicott organized the first training day to drill settlers in 1630. In 1637 the first militia muster was organized by the Massachusetts Bay Colony Court.

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Cadet Band, ca: 1910, led by Jean Missud.

Today we know Winter Island for its beach, boat ramp, and beautiful lighthouse. Originally named for King William, the original fort dates back to 1643-1667. It was renamed for Salem’s Colonel Timothy Pickering in 1799, and became a Coast Guard Air Station in 1935.

Six weeks prior to the “shot heard around the world on Lexington Green,” British Colonel Alexander Leslie retreated from a gathering of angry citizens on Salem’s North Bridge. Leslie and the 64th regiment had been sent by the British governor general of Massachusetts, Thomas Gage, to seize Colonial cannons and gunpowder in Salem. Leslie’s Retreat is considered by many to have been the first armed resistance of the American Revolution. Learn more about Leslie’s Retreat in this article from The Boston Globe.

Salem Privateers made a name for themselves during the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. Privateers were privately owned vessels that had government permission to capture enemy vessels during wartime, and during the Revolutionary War alone Salem sent out 158 privateers that captured 444 prizes (enemy ships), more than half the number taken by all the Colonies during the war. Today you can sail aboard a replica Salem Privateer, Schooner FAME, out of Pickering Wharf.

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Salem Coast Guard matchbook (front).

Include the Pickering House on Broad Street in your visit to       Salem, and you will be exploring the birthplace of Colonel Timothy Pickering, who was an officer in the Continental Army and   Quartermaster during the Revolutionary War. Pickering’s career went on to include Adjutant General of the Army, Secretary of State, and   Secretary of War. Pickering, who was known for his unwavering integrity, lack of prejudice, devotion to justice, and commitment to service, is buried in the Broad Street Cemetery.

Glover’s Regiment claims Marblehead as its home, but Colonel John Glover was born on St. Peter’s Street in Salem. A good friend of General George Washington’s, Glover’s Regiment ferried Washington across the Delaware River, and Glover’s Schooner HANNAH was the first commissioned ship in the US Navy.

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Salem Coast Guard matchbook (back).

Salem mathematician and navigator Nathaniel Bowditch wrote “The New American Practical Navigator.” Known as “The Bowditch,” a copy of this book was been onboard Naval and Coast Guard vessels since the War of 1812.

Residents and visitors still remember when two US Naval Submarines were docked at Derby Wharf, used as training vessels during World War II.

Salem’s military connections continue today, most notably in newly-elected Congressman Seth Moulton, who served in the Marine Corps in the Iraq War.

Armory Park, adjacent to the Salem Regional Visitor Center, pays tribute to more than 365 years of military heritage in Essex County and includes a timeline tracing the history of the citizen soldier and the Second Corps of Cadets.

Material for this feature was provided by Bonnie Hurd Smith, Nelson Dionne, Schooner FAME, and SethMoulton.com.

Leslie’s Retreat Community Reenactment

Mark the Occasion! Join the Ranks! A fun and informal reenactment of Colonel Leslie’s 1775 march to the Salem, the taunting by the townspeople, and the compromise crossing of the North River. Then we will all retreat together to the First Church for some warm refreshment.

You can be part of the British Army:
11:30 am – Meet at Hamilton Hall – bring your recorders and slide whistles – leave the muskets and bayonets at home. Be ready to walk up to a mile (weather dependent).

Or you can join the townspeople to hurl colonial insult:
11:45 am – Meet at First Church in Salem UU – All are welcome to attend the service that begins at 10:30 and will be dismissed by the warning that the Redcoats are coming. Or you can mingle in the churchyard and greet the congregants who will join the crowd in opposition of the British march.

Or stand your ground with the militia:
11:50 am – Corner of Federal and North Streets. The theatrical confrontation between Colonel Leslie and Captain Felt will need an angry crowd in the background. All surly colonists invited.

Colonists and British soldiers are then invited back to First Church for warm drinks and refreshment (12-1pm).

Hosted by the First Church in Salem UU, Salem Historical Society and Historic Salem Inc.

Salem.org