Deliver Us from Evil: Counter-Magic in Early New England

Emerson W. Baker of the Salem State University History Department will talk about why folk magic was far more common in colonial New England than most of us realize.  Daisy wheel marks, witch bottles, well-worn shoes by fireplaces or a horseshoe over a doorway are examples of the counter-magic employed to protect homes and families from evil. They are also evidence that New Englanders dabbled in magic, and feared witches and supernatural forces long after the Salem witch trials ended.

The lecture will be followed by a book signing with Dr. Baker and his work, A Storm of Witchcraft.

This lecture is $10.00 for the general public and free for members of The Gables. Advance tickets will go on sale for this lecture mid-July, 2018.

For more information, email jarrison@7gables.org, or call 978-744-0991 ext. 152.

Emerson “Tad” Baker is interim dean of Graduate and Professional Studies and a professor of History at Salem State University.  He is the award-winning author of many works on the history of and archaeology of early New England, including A Storm of Witchcraft: The Salem Trials and the American Experience. He has served as an advisor for PBS-TV’s American Experience and Colonial House. Baker is a member of the Gallows Hill Project team who recently confirmed the witch trials execution site, and he has co-authored an iPhone app on the witchcraft crisis.

Layers of Paint, Layers of History

Christine Thomson is a local conservator whose specialty is paint analysis. This scientific technique is used in historic buildings to help with restoration work and to share better historical information with staff and visitors alike. Ms. Thomson will talk about the importance and techniques of paint analysis and share her 2016 research findings from The House of the Seven Gables. In 2018, The Gables celebrates its 350th anniversary and this talk is complementary to the exhibit These Walls Do Talk, which opens on April 6.

This talk is being held as part of the Essex National Heritage Area’s Trails and Sails weekends. Check out their page for a week of fabulous events around Greater Boston.

This talk is free and open to the public. Please click here to register.

Interactions Between Poetry and Painting: Alfred, Lord Tennyson

In this three-lecture series at the Salem Athenaeum, Dr. Sue Weaver Schopf will explore questions that have often been asked in studies of the sister arts: What can poetry express that painting cannot? What can painting express that poetry cannot? And what are the artistic possibilities when painting and poetry work in tandem to convey ideas and express emotion?

William Blake and Dante Gabriel Rossetti were both painters and poets, who experimented with the potential of each medium. But when they began to illustrate their poetry, they discovered the full range of expression possible when the visual and verbal arts function as compliments to each other.

Among the many poems of the 19th century, none were more frequently illustrated than those by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. What drew artists to his poetry, and how did their paintings enhance or further elucidate the author’s works? These interesting dynamics will be the subject of separate lectures on April 20 (Blake), May 16 (Rossetti), and June 6 (Tennyson). A list of poems to be considered will be made available before each lecture.

Sue Weaver Schopf is Distinguished Service Lecturer and retired Associate Dean at the Harvard Extension School. She has served on the board of the Salem Athenaeum and is a member the Program Committee.

Tickets ($10-15) available online.

Finding & Sharing Local History

We are all stewards of history. Many of us have family treasures and heirlooms at home, but how can we best preserve and share them? Join Essex Heritage, the National Park Service, and the Salem Historical Commission for a free Preservation Month workshop with museum and archive professionals to learn how you can care for and share local history.

Speakers include:
Susan Edwards, University Archivist and Special
Collections Librarian, Salem State University
Emily Murphy, Curator, Salem Maritime and Saugus
Ironworks National Historic Sites
Alyssa Conary, Operations Manager, Historic Salem
Anya Wilczynski, Program Manager, Essex Heritage
Amy Kellett, DIY Archives Project
Jen Ratliff, Trustee, Salem Historical Society

For more information, contact Anya Wilczynski, Manager of Membership & Programs, Essex Heritage, (978) 740-0444, anyaw@essexheritage.org

Sophia Peabody Hawthorne: Citizen of the World

Sophia Peabody Hawthorne moved beyond her 19th century New England roots to become an intrepid traveler and an expatriate. Her capacity to appreciate foreign cultures and her decision to leave her native land forever are topics that raise a question with contemporary relevance:  What exactly does it mean to be an American?

This is a special lecture with Patricia Dunlavy Valenti at The House of the Seven Gables. A book signing in our Museum Store will follow the lecture.

Members: FREE

Non-Members: $10.00

To reserve your spot for this lecture please click here; dmarshall@7gables.org, or call 978-744-0991 ext. 101.

Interactions between Poetry and Painting: Dante Gabriel Rossetti

In this three-lecture series, Dr. Sue Weaver Schopf will explore questions that have often been asked in studies of the sister arts: What can poetry express that painting cannot? What can painting express that poetry cannot? And what are the artistic possibilities when painting and poetry work in tandem to convey ideas and express emotion?

William Blake and Dante Gabriel Rossetti were both painters and poets, who experimented with the potential of each medium. But when they began to illustrate their poetry, they discovered the full range of expression possible when the visual and verbal arts function as compliments to each other.

Among the many poems of the 19th century, none were more frequently illustrated than those by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. What drew artists to his poetry, and how did their paintings enhance or further elucidate the author’s works? These interesting dynamics will be the subject of separate lectures on April 20 (Blake), May 16 (Rossetti), and June 6 (Tennyson). A list of poems to be considered will be made available before each lecture.

Sue Weaver Schopf is Distinguished Service Lecturer and retired Associate Dean at the Harvard Extension School. She has served on the board of the Salem Athenaeum and is a member the Program Committee.

Event takes place at the Salem Athenaeum. Tickets are $10 for members and $15 for non-members.

“It’s for the Birds!”

Peabody Essex Museum

Douglas Tallamy, a giant in the natural gardening world and author of Bringing Nature Home, shares his deep knowledge of the important roles native plants play in maintaining food webs for birds. Discover ways you can transform a garden into a haven for birds. A book signing follows.

Made possible by a generous donation from The Echo Charitable Foundation.
Co-sponsored by The Essex County Ornithological Club.

Free/reservations not required. Visit PEM.org for more information.

“These Walls Do Talk” Exhibit Opening at the Gables

Join us for the opening of our annual exhibit, These Walls Do Talk. The 2018 exhibit shares the science and history about how we know what we know about the 350-year-old Turner-Ingersoll Mansion including analysis of paint, wallpaper, and architecture and primary source documents such as deeds and drawings.

The exhibit opening is an open house event. Join us to raise a glass in celebration of the 350th anniversary of The House of the Seven Gables.

This event is free and open to the public. Click here to RSVP.

For more information email jarrison@7gables.org or call 978-744-0991 ext. 152.

Women’s History Day at the Gables

The House of the Seven Gables will commemorate Salem Women’s History Day with a special women’s history tour and two lectures focusing on the role of women in preservation.

All events are free for members and Salem residents. Regular admission for the general public includes a tour and admission to both lectures. Space is limited for all events. Click here to register. For more information email jarrison@7Gables.org or call 978-744-0991 ext. 152.

12:00 – 12:45 p.m. Women’s history focused tour of The Gables

1:00 – 1:45 p.m. “My Patriotic Duty” – Women and the Preservation of Old South Meeting House Boston

When Boston’s iconic Old South Meeting House was threatened with imminent demolition in 1876, public outrage ensued. A group of Boston area women, led by philanthropist Mary        Hemenway, became the driving force behind the building’s successful preservation. The “20 women of Boston,” as this group came to be known, organized fundraisers to secure a mortgage and then ensure the building’s ongoing preservation and future security. Women involved with ongoing preservation efforts in the 1870s-1880s included author Louisa May Alcott, and even Mary Tyler of “Mary Had a Little Lamb” fame. Erica Lindamood, director of education at Old South Meeting House, will share highlights from this colorful historic preservation success story, and consider Hemenway’s claim that her advocacy for the building was her “patriotic duty” in light of 19th-century politics and social history.

2:00 – 2:45 p.m. The Tireless Traditionalist: Mary Harrod Northend and “Old Salem”, 1904-1926.

One of Salem’s most entrepreneurial representatives of the Colonial Revival movement was Salem-born author and entrepreneur Mary Harrod Northend (1850-1926), who wrote 11 books and countless magazine articles from 1904 until her accidental death in 1926, advancing an earnest and idealistic vision of New England in general, and “Old Salem” in particular, as style sources for the present and future.

3:00 – 3:45 Women’s history focused tour of The Gables

Events will be ongoing at the Witch House and the Phillips House Museum. Please visit their websites for details. 

A Celebration of Food at The House of the Seven Gables

How do you celebrate 350 years of history? With a Salem Food Tour, of course! Meet at The House of the Seven Gables for a 17th-century food demonstration. Continue down Derby Street and through historic Salem sampling delicious offerings around town while learning about the unique connections to spices, rum, trade, and more.

Proceeds from the tour will benefit preservation and education programs at The House of the Seven Gables.

To reserve your spot for this lecture ($60) please visit www.salemfoodtours.com/reservations and request March 18 in the online form. For questions please call 978-744-0991 ext. 152.

The Irish Experience at the Phillips House

What did it take to keep Phillips House running smoothly? Get a glimpse of the daily duties and living quarters of the Phillips family’s Irish domestic staff at this well-appointed home. Hear the stories of cook Bridget Durkin, waitress Delia Cawley, and nursemaid Catherine Shaughnessy and see where they lived as it looked in 1919. Space is limited.

$15 Historic New England members
$20 nonmembers

Registration is required. Please call 978-744-0440 for more information or see website.

Salem.org