The Work of Rodin Interpreted in Dance

101 Dancers

BoSoma Dance Company, 2016. Photo by Kathy Tarantola / Peabody Essex Museum.

The Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) and BoSoma Dance Company present 101 days of modern gestural performance in the museum’s headlining exhibition, Rodin: Transforming Sculpture. Dancers will respond to sculptures by Auguste Rodin (1840-1917), including masterpieces such as “The Thinker,” “The Kiss” and “The Hand of God.” Performances will take place daily from 11 am to 4:30 pm for the entire run of the exhibition – May 14  through September 5, 2016.

Whether working in plaster, marble or bronze, Rodin captured the emotional and psychological complexities of the human experience in ways that few sculptors have achieved, before or since. Pairing sculptures with movement in the gallery will heighten the emotional experiences of the sculptures and allow for another entry point into considering aspects of the human form and how Rodin was inspired by the body.

BoSoma Dance Company of Peabody, Mass., will lead the daily gestural performances. Dancers will juxtapose human limbs, joints and muscular forms with sculpted body parts in performances woven into the exhibition.

ABOUT BOSOMA DANCE COMPANY

Founded in 2003, BoSoma is a modern dance company under the artistic direction and leadership of Katherine Hooper.  The company’s mission is to make dance captivating and accessible through dynamic performance and community education.

ABOUT THE PEABODY ESSEX MUSEUM

Over the last 20 years, the Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) has distinguished itself as one of the fastest-growing art museums in North America. Founded in 1799, it is also the country’s oldest continuously operating museum. At its heart is a mission to enrich and transform people’s lives by broadening their perspectives, attitudes and knowledge of themselves and the wider world. PEM celebrates outstanding artistic and cultural creativity through exhibitions, programming and special events that emphasize cross-cultural connections, integrate past and present and underscore the vital importance of creative expression. The museum’s collection is among the finest of its kind boasting superlative works from around the globe and across time — including American art and architecture, Asian export art, photography, maritime art and history, Native American, Oceanic and African art. PEM’s campus affords a varied and unique visitor experience with hands-on creativity zones, interactive opportunities and performance spaces. Twenty-four noted historic structures grace PEM’s campus, including Yin Yu Tang, a 200-year-old Chinese house that is the only such example of Chinese domestic architecture on display in the United States, and the Phillips Library, which holds one of the nation’s most important museum-based collections of rare books and manuscripts.

HOURS: Open Tuesday-Sunday, 10 am-5 pm, and the third Thursday of every month until 9 pm. Closed Mondays, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day.

ADMISSION: Adults $18; seniors $15; students $10. Additional admission to Yin Yu Tang: $5. Members, youth 16 and under and residents of Salem enjoy free general admission and free admission to Yin Yu Tang.

INFO: Call 866‐745‐1876 or visit pem.org.

“Shoes: Pleasure and Pain” at the Peabody Essex Museum

The Peabody Essex Museum’s latest exhibition, Shoes: Pleasure and Pain, is an exploration into over 300 pairs of shoes through their varied histories, cultural significance, and even the personal experiences of those who collect or wear them. The exhibition, which is making its U.S. debut at the Peabody Essex Museum (PEM), is organized by the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

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Salvatore Ferragamo, Rainbow sandal, 1938 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Image courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum.

Lynda Roscoe Hartigan, PEM’s James B. and Mary Lou Hawkes Deputy Director, has enjoyed sharing her own passions for shoes while working as the coordinating curator for the exhibition. Hartigan’s personal stories which are displayed throughout the exhibit, begin with the moment when she first acknowledged the importance of shoes in her life, during a forest fire that threatened her childhood home: “My mother told my brother and me to grab two things to take in the car. What did I choose? My pink teddy bear and brand new pair of black patent leather Mary Janes.”

The exhibit is divided into different themes: Transformation, Status, Seduction, Creation, and Obsession. Each section features shoes that fit the theme, from a variety of time periods and owners, like David Beckham, Elton John, and Naomi Campbell. In addition many of the shoes were designed by such well-known names in the fashion industry such as Christian Louboutin and Jimmy Choo, and some of the shoes were even crafted locally in the towns of Lynn and Haverhill. Other local connections in the exhibit are the 110 pairs shoes added to the display from the PEM’s fashion collection, and the shoes in the Obsession gallery that belong to local collectors, Jimmy Raye, and Lillian Montalto Bohlen.

The opening day festival for Shoes: Pleasure and Pain takes place on Saturday, November 19th, and will feature a variety of shoe-themed events that are included with museum admission. Among the events are a sneaker museum pop-up exhibition, showcasing the contemporary culture surrounding sneakers, and a shoemaking demonstration where guests can see how shoes are made with artist Malika Green. The opening day festival is made possible by the Lowell Foundation, and the full schedule of events may be found on the PEM’s website.

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Sebastian Errazuriz, “The Golddigger,” “The Heartbreaker,” and “The Boss,” from the “12 Shoes for 12 Lovers” collection, 2013, 3D-printed acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene polymer, resin, and acrylic. Museum purchase, 2015, Peabody Essex Museum. © 2016 Peabody Essex Museum. Photography by Kathy Tarantola.

During the first two weeks of the exhibition, PEM is partnering with Dress for Success Boston through a shoe drive held at the museum to assist disadvantaged women with dressing professionally while attending job interviews. The organization allows women to work with volunteer stylists in selection the best outfits for interviews at no cost to them. Dress for Success asks that all donated shoes be appropriate for job interviews, with solid colors preferred and no open-toe, slingback, mule, or stiletto platform shoes may be accepted. Guests looking to donate shoes may bring them to the entrance of the museum where a volunteer will assist them.

The recent initiative in expanding the museum’s fashion collection is evident through Shoes: Pleasure and Pain. With an exhibit design that contrasts from the typical retail environment, guests are able to take away a greater knowledge and understanding about shoes, and fashion in general, serve not only as art but as creative forms of personal expression. Hartigan summarizes the theme of the exhibit in stating, “Shoes are about the personal creativity of the designer and the person who wears that shoe. It’s a partnership between two people who likely never meet. You can make something wonderful, but if someone doesn’t respond to it, there is something incomplete about the act. Creation is about communication.”

Shoes: Pleasure and Pain is on view from November 19, 2016 – March 12, 2017, and is included in museum admission. For complete information on the opening day festival and the Dress for Success donation program, please visit PEM.org.

Spirits of the Gables

Discover one of New England’s most iconic houses and enjoy this charming National Historic Landmark site in a unique and enchanting way during the month of October.  On select weekend nights in October, step into the world of Salem author Nathaniel Hawthorne as you experience two dramatic theatrical performances played out within houses connected directly to Hawthorne himself.

During Spirits of the Gables, get swept into Hawthorne’s tale of guilt, greed and revenge as the characters from The House of the Seven Gables (1851), come to life and recount their stories while you walk through the very house that inspired Hawthorne’s timeless novel.

Performances begin every five minutes in The House of the Seven Gables and last approximately 35 minutes. Last performance begins at closing.

Reservations highly recommended. Visit 7gables.org for information and tickets.

Wicked Wednesdays at The House of the Seven Gables

The House of the Seven Gables is part of Salem’s brand new Wicked Wednesdays program. Families are encouraged to check out Salem on select Wednesday evenings in October and enjoy great deals and special programs.

At The Gables, the Family Navigation Game will be offered during regular operating hours and included with admission to the site. Families will be given all of the tools they need to explore the grounds of our National Historic Landmark District and learn about architecture and the Great Age of Sail.

After 4:30 p.m., The Gables will offer up to two free children/student admissions per paid adult/senior admission for guided tours.

Full details about hours and admission can be found at www.7Gables.org or by calling 978-744-0991 ext. 152.

“Ocean Liners: Glamour, Speed, and Style” at the Peabody Essex Museum

 

F. Earl for Henri Fichon, Paris, Design for a poster for the White Star Line and Moet & Chandon, about 1912, oil on canvas. Museum purchase, 2014.13.1. Photo by Kathy Tarantola.

Ocean Liners: Glamour, Speed, and Style, the latest exhibition at the Peabody Essex Museum, details the design and technical sides of these grand vessels while also placing them into an international cultural narrative. In collaboration with the Victoria and Albert Museum, London (V&A), this event is the first of its kind as previous exhibits have focused on ocean liners, but none have taken into consideration their legacy across different nations.

PEM was founded by sea captains and merchant traders in 1799, and in addition to the various pieces brought to Salem during the 18th and 19th centuries, the museum has been collecting works related to ocean liners since the 1870s. Continuing in this maritime tradition, Ocean Liners: Glamour Speed, and Style takes guests on a voyage from the elegant ocean liners to contemporary cruise ships and everything in between.

Among the pieces shown in the exhibit, guests may expect to see brightly colored posters originally used during advertising campaigns in the early 20th century to change public beliefs that ocean travel was luxurious and elegant rather than grimy and unsafe. Other pieces include models of well-known ocean liners like the Queen Elizabeth (pictured below), and decorative elements from a variety of ocean liner models and time periods.

Basset-Lowke Ltd., Model of Queen Elizabeth, 1947-48, white mahogany, gunmetal, and brass. Gift of Cunard Line Ltd., 1970, M14220. © 2016 Peabody Essex Museum. Photography by Kathy Tarantola.

Ocean Liners: Glamour, Speed, and Style gives insight into the rising the rise of ocean travel as an opulent pastime while also showing open models, paperwork, and pieces of engines to portray what took place behind the scenes to make such grand travel possible. Despite companies having the technological abilities to design even faster ships, displayed in the exhibit by portions of engines and mechanical frameworks, speed was often sacrificed for comfort to further entice guests to come aboard for the ultimate leisure travel experience.

The exhibit goes on to show how other artistic elements produced onboard impacted their counterparts on land, concepts that are particularly evident when viewing cruise-wear, elegant high fashion dresses and tuxedos, and up and coming interior design ideas.

PEM hosts the Opening Day Deep Dive event to kick off the exhibit on May 20, 2017 from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm. During this event guests may view vintage trunks and additional models in the museum’s atrium, create their own luggage stickers, play shuffleboard, and more: Click here to view the complete event schedule. Ocean Liners: Glamour, Speed, and Style will be on view at PEM through October 9, 2017, and more information about the exhibit is available at PEM.org.

Heritage Days at The House of the Seven Gables

House of the Seven Gables Weddings

From August 4-13 at The House of the Seven Gables, visitors can learn about sailing the high seas with a variety of family-friendly and hands-on activities. The Family Navigation Game is offered daily from 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. The Living History Labs hands-on history experience will take place daily from 10:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. and 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.

All events are included with admission to museum. Admission is free for Salem residents and members of The Gables. The annual exhibit in the Visitor Center is free and open to the public. For rates, hours, and more details, please visit www.7Gables.org.

Summertime Day-Trip Itinerary to Salem from Boston

Looking for day-trip ideas from Boston? Salem is located just 16 miles north of the city, making it a convenient and memorable day-trip to take while visiting Boston.

During the season (May 20 – October 31) the Salem Ferry can travel from Boston’s Long Wharf to Blaney Street in Salem in just under one hour. To make the most of a day-trip to Salem, plan on taking the 9:30 am ferry, and arriving in Salem just before 10:30 am. Tickets may be purchased online in advance of your trip, and rates and schedules are available at SalemFerry.com.

 

 

Purchase your ferry tickets online, and you will also have the option of selecting a combination ticket for the Salem Ferry and the Salem Trolley. With your trolley ticket, you will be able to pick up the trolley from the stop located by the Salem Ferry landing and take in an overview of Salem’s history in a one-hour trolley tour (with the option to hop on and off as you like).

Ride through a couple of stops on the trolley, and hop off at the Peabody Essex Museum. One of the fastest-growing art museums in the country, the Peabody Essex Museum offers a large collection of Asian and maritime art along with historical house tours, including the 200 year old Yin Yu Tang house which was moved to the museum from China. Admission rates for the museum and a calendar of events may be viewed prior to your visit at PEM.org.

 

 

Once you have your fill of art for the day, hop back on the trolley and go one stop to the Witch Dungeon Museum. At the museum, learn about the tragic events that unfolded in 1692 through an award-winning reenactment of one of the trials followed by a guided tour of the dungeon. Thinking about spending more time in Salem? Consider purchasing a combination pass for the Witch Dungeon Museum, Witch History Museum, and New England Pirate Museum if your day trip turns into an overnight stay.

Ready for lunch? Hop back on the trolley to continue the tour, and hop off on Pickering Wharf. Walk around the corner of the Salem Waterfront Hotel and Suites and enjoy lunch near the waterfront at the hotel’s Regatta Pub. The Regatta Pub offers a relaxed atmosphere with indoor and outdoor seating available to enjoy lunch by the water.

 

 

After lunch, pick up the trolley on Pickering Wharf and continue the last couple of stops along the tour before hopping off once more on Blaney Street. From here, spend the afternoon aboard Sea Shuttle’s catamaran Endeavor while learning about various sea creatures in an onboard aquarium and taking in beautiful views of Salem Harbor and Misery Island.

With some time to spare before returning to Boston for the evening, take the trolley back towards the downtown area and hop off at the Salem Regional Visitor Center. A short walk up St. Peter’s Street will bring you to Bit Bar, where you can enjoy retro-gaming inspired cocktails while showing off your skills on classic arcade games from the 80s and 90s.

 

 

The last two departures for the Salem Ferry from Blaney Street are 4:00 pm and 7:00 pm. Keep your eye on the time while playing at Bit Bar and be sure to get back to the Ferry Landing in time to make your return trip to Boston. Looking to catch the 7:00 pm ferry but worried about getting there with the trolley tour ending at 5? Walk to the nearest Zagster bike station and take a scenic ride back down to Blaney Street to meet the ferry.

Metal Macabaret PEM/PM After Hours Party

Visit the Peabody Essex Museum for the Metal Macabaret PEM/PM After Hours Party. PEM partners with Salem Horror Fest for a night of special programming, live music, and current exhibition: It’s Alive!: Classic Horror and Sci-Fi Art from the Kirk Hammett Collection. Entire museum is open late, and Salem Horror Fest’s screening of Night of the Living Dead begins at 9:00 pm.

 

GLOW PEM/PM After Hours Party

Join us for cocktails, live music, and artsy socializing as we celebrate our new immersive exhibition: XYZY: A Journey in 4 Dimensions. Entire museum is open late. Visit PEM.org for more information.

Gendering Work: Mills, Homes, and Everywhere Else in the Industrial Era

The House of the Seven Gables Settlement Association was founded to preserve the famed Turner-Ingersoll Mansion and to provide support services for newly arriving immigrants in 1910. Salem’s Point Neighborhood has long been one of the enclaves for immigrant families. Elizabeth Duclos-Orsello will offer a walking tour of the Point neighborhood focusing on the work in the mills, small neighborhood business, and homes, with a particular focus on the sites of women’s work. What has made this neighborhood function through the years? Join us to find out.

This program will be offered for free as part of Essex National Heritage Area’s Trails and Sails events. Space is limited and registration is required.

The walking tour will last 60 – 90 minutes depending on crowd size.

Please note: This event meets at Lafayette Park on the corners of Washington and Lafayette Streets in Salem. Information about parking can be found at www.salem.com.

To reserve your spot for this walking tour please CLICK HERE; email groups@7gables.org, or call 978-744-0991 ext. 152.

August PEM/PM: End-of-Summer Blues Vol. 2

PEM/PM
End-of-Summer Blues Vol. 2
Thursday, August 17, 2017
6-9 pm

ENTIRE MUSEUM IS OPEN
Cash bar | Small plates menu from the Hawthorne Hotel

ALL NIGHT LONG
Art Making | Atrium
Play those summer blues away with your own DIY harmonica (while supplies last).

Backyard BBQ & Cocktails | Atrium
The Atrium Café has prepared some classic and inventive takes on barbecue. Offerings available for purchase include Burger Sliders with sharp cheddar, caramelized onions, and a side salad ($7.00), Pulled Pork with coleslaw and cornbread ($8.00), “Elotes” grilled Mexican street corn ($3.50), Open Faced S’mores ($3.00), and more.

Giant Lawn Games | Atrium
Play a few rounds of giant Jenga, giant Connect Four and jumbo Bananagrams.

Live Music | Atrium
6:30-7:15 pm The Squeezebox Stompers (Cajun and Zydeco)
7:30-8:45 pm The Grits and Groceries Orchestra featuring Barrence Whitfield (Blues)
Co-organized with 92.5 the River.

6-8:30 pm
Whiskey Tasting | Atrium
Sample Bully Boy Distillers’ White Whiskey and Aged Whiskey, as well as James E. Pepper Rye Whiskey (while supplies last).

The History Buff’s Guide to Salem, Massachusetts

Salem, Massachusetts is a history lover’s paradise. With colonial and maritime history, and the history of the Salem Witch Trials, along with spectacular architecture dating from the 17th to early 20th centuries, Salem offers a host of historical museums, attractions, and even restaurants and shops. Make history during your visit to Salem by checking out all there is to do, eat, and shop, or by following our suggestions below.

Upon arriving in Salem, visit the Salem Regional Visitor Center to get your bearings and catch a short introductory film. The Visitor Center offers two films that provide background information for your visit to Salem: Where Past is Present a 27-minute film covering the general history of Salem, and Salem Witch Hunt, a 35-minute film presented by Essex Heritage that focuses exclusively on the Salem Witch Trials.

 

 

Before leaving the Visitor Center, pick up a brochure or two for a free self-guided walking tour on a topic like Architecture in Salem or African American Heritage Sites in Salem. For another way to make your way to Salem’s historical sites on foot, catch the red line on the sidewalk and follow the Salem Heritage Trail. If you do not have time to complete an entire self-guided tour, pull out the guide when you happen to be near relevant sites to learn more on the go or break up the tour across multiple days.

From the Visitor Center, walk down Essex Street towards Washington Street. Pass the statue of Samantha from Bewitched and continue to the next intersection until you come to the Witch House. The building was home to Witch Trials Judge Jonathan Corwin, making it the only remaining structure in Salem today with direct ties to the events in 1692. Take a tour of the house (guided or self-guided) to learn about Judge Corwin and his role in the Witch Trials as well as 17th-century architecture and home life.

 

 

 

Around the corner from the Witch House you will find the Ropes Mansion, which was built in 1727 and renovated in 1894. The architectural style of the building is detailed in the Architecture in Salem guide you may have picked up from the Visitor Center. The mansion is currently owned by the Peabody Essex Museum, which offers free self-guided tours of the interior on Saturdays and Sundays through the fall.

Walk back towards the Witch House to turn right onto Summer Street and take another right onto Chestnut Street going until you find #34, Historic New England’s Phillips House. Built in 1821, by Captain Nathaniel West, the home was later inhabited by the Phillips family, whose collection is on display for guests to view today. Tours of the Phillips House, which begin every half hour, offer insight into what day-to-day life was like in the early 20th-century for both the Phillips family and their staff. The building is designed in the Colonial Revival architectural style and is one another of the stops in the Architecture in Salem guide.

 

 

When you’re ready for lunch, continue back down Essex Street crossing the street by the beginning of the Pedestrian Mall and take a left. Continue down Washington Street until you come to Church Street on the right, and visit Turner’s Seafood for lunch. Turner’s location within the Lyceum brings allows guests to dine in the building where in 1877 Alexander Graham Bell completed the first long distance telephone call while enjoying a menu of fresh, locally sourced seafood dishes.

After lunch, return to the Essex Street Pedestrian Mall to visit Bewitched in Salem and pick up the Bewitched Historical Tour. This informative two-hour walking tour brings you to various sites where you will learn about Salem’s colonial history along with the history of the Salem Witch Trials, maritime lore, present-day Salem and more.

 

 

Following your walking tour, visit the House of the Seven Gables to learn not only about Nathaniel Hawthorne’s famous novel but also about the site’s architecture and local maritime history. Take a guided tour through the home, and visit the seaside gardens and Nathaniel Hawthorne’s birthplace. To take some of Salem’s history home with you, visit the House of the Seven Gables Gift Shop. The shop features literary-themed goods as well as historical treasures to remember your visit to Salem from home.

Do some more shopping for yourself or the history buffs you have waiting at home on your way back to the downtown area by stopping at Waite and Peirce on Derby Street. Waite and Peirce is home to authentic and recreated goods from Salem’s past and the shop is also a great place to pick up some additional information about the Salem Maritime National Historic Site.

Want to make your “History Buff” day trip into an overnight stay? Book a room at one of Salem’s local historic inns, or at the Hawthorne Hotel, which is a Historic Hotel of America constructed in 1925.

For even more to see and do during your next visit to Salem, create your own adventure using the icons on our homepage.

Salem.org