Wild Edibles at Bakers Island Light

Come join naturalist and wild foods enthusiast, Russ Cohen on a special edible excursion out to Bakers Island Light Station, a historic property owned by Essex Heritage. This 3.5 hour special trip includes the boat ride aboard Naumkeag and a walking tour of the property with expert Russ Cohen pointing out special species along the trails including the kind you can snack on! Before departing for the main land, enjoy sumacade (a natural alternative to Kool-Aid) and a wild goodie or two made by Russ Cohen himself! The wild edibles tour includes over 3 dozen species of edible wild plants that have existed on the island for some time. Also expect to encounter at least six of the additional native wild edible species that were planted last summer.

Tickets ($40) and additional information available through Essex Heritage.

A Stroll Through the Gardens of Salem with Salem Garden Club

The Salem Garden Club hosts a self-guided “Garden Stroll” with a tour of private gardens in the McIntire Historic District. Featured are more than 10 traditional, quaint, and eclectic gardens. Ticket holders will also enjoy a stroll through the beautiful Ropes Mansion Garden. Complimentary refreshments of lemonade and cookies will be served to strollers along the route. Local musicians and artists will be featured in several gardens. These private gardens are not handicapped accessible. Pets and carriages are not permitted.

This fund raiser benefits many Salem civic projects which include:
• the planting and maintenance of the Washington Street traffic island;
• the plantings of the City Hall window boxes;
• the plantings at the Blue Star Memorial on Hawthorne Boulevard;
• providing monthly flower arrangement at the Salem Public Library; and,
• an annual scholarship awarded to a deserving Salem High School senior.

Tickets: $20 on day of the tour at First Church, 316 Essex Street, Salem, MA
($18 if purchased by Thursday, July 6, 2017 on SalemGardenClub.com)
For tickets, parking and specific details visit: SalemGardenClub.com.

North Shore Medical Center Cancer Walk

Each year thousands of participants join together with family members, colleagues and friends for the North Shore Cancer WALK. As a walker, volunteer or donor, you can be part of an inspirational day in the fight against cancer.

The 10K (6.2 mile) WALK route is an unforgettable journey of shared purpose and commitment. It winds through historic Salem, featuring an array of entertainers that lend a festive air to this profound community event. We encourage you to become a part of this annual celebration of life, hope and courage of all those who have been touched by this disease.

Proceeds from the WALK will support oncology services at North Shore Medical Center and the Massachusetts General/North Shore Cancer Center. In the past, WALK contributions have supported renovations, clinical trials, wellness services such as massage and acupuncture to help alleviate pain and nausea, as well as supportive care programs for patients and their families.

See website for complete information and how you can support North Shore Medical Center’s oncology services.

See the Sights from Salem’s Heritage Trail

Salem Heritage Trail

Salem’s Red Line – or Heritage Trail – exists to guide visitors between historic sites and destinations. Intended to inspire self-guided exploration, there are a few stops along the way that you might not want to miss.

The National Park Service Salem Regional Visitor Center, 2 New Liberty Street, is a perfect place to start. Watch the free 27-minute film, Where Past is Present, which appeals to all ages and provides an overview of Salem’s and Essex County’s history. From here, cross the street…

The Peabody Essex Museum, 161 Essex Street, is the oldest continually operated museum in the country. The museum features exceptional collections of art and culture as from around the world including Asian art, Asian export art, Maritime art, Native American art, as well as changing exhibits and programming. Continue west on Essex Street…

East India Marine Hall faces the fountain at East India Square and contains the original display cases and some of the very first objects collected by the Salem captains who established the Peabody Essex Museum in 1799. Continue along Essex Street…

You will pass boutiques, shops, cafes, and the Witch History Museum. At the corner of Essex and Washington Streets, pause at the former Daniel Low Building to read the plaque that notes the building as the site of Salem’s first Town Hall, and the location where delegates for the first Continental Congress were chosen in 1774. Turn around and you will see…

The fountain in Town House Square marks the supposed location of Salem’s first fresh water source, which was immortalized by Nathaniel Hawthorne in his short story, A Rill from the Town Pump. The 1970s era fountain was restored in 2014, when a marble base with Hawthorne’s words was installed. Cross Washington Street to…

 

The statue of Samantha Stevens from Bewitched. The television series filmed several episodes in Salem in the early 1970s after fire damaged the studios in California. The statue was erected by TV Land in 2005, and today she is one of the most photographed landmarks. Continue along Essex Street, cross Summer Street and…

You will see the 17th-century Witch House. The only building still standing in Salem with direct ties to the Salem Witch Trials of 1692, this was the family home of Judge Jonathan Corwin. Across the street you will see…

 

A monument remembering Salem Captain William Driver, who named the American flag “Old Glory.” Today, that flag, which was given to Driver by his mother as he departed on a trip, is part of the Smithsonian collection.

Adjacent to the Driver plaque is the entrance to the Samuel McIntire Architectural District. Brochures for the self-guided walking tour of this remarkable neighborhood are available at the Visitor Center and online.

Salem, MA, Ropes Mansion

Adjacent to the Witch House is the First Church in Salem, which was the parish of many of the accused during the Salem Witch Trials. This church features stunning Gothic architecture and Tiffany windows.

The Heritage Trail finds its end on Essex Street at the Ropes Mansion, which is part of the Peabody Essex Museum collection. The Ropes Gardens are open and free to the public.

Reversing direction, turn left on North Street and continue to Lynde Street. Turn right on Lynde and walk to the Witch Dungeon Museum, which features a plaque that remembers “The With Gaol.” The original “gaol” (jail) was located on Federal Street, two blocks from the Witch Dungeon Museum (not on the Red Line). Continue along Lynde Street and turn right onto Washington Street…

Salem City Hall at 93 Washington Street was built in 1837-38 from funds dispersed to Salem from a US Treasury Surplus. The Mayor’s office and City Council chambers have remained unchanged since 1838. Continue to Front Street, so named because this was the original Salem Waterfront. Turn left, walking past…

Old Town Hall in Derby Square. The oldest surviving municipal structure in Salem, Old Town Hall dates back to 1816-17. The second floor of the building, Great Hall, has always been used as a public hall, and contained Town offices until 1837. The first floor functioned as a public market and today is home to the Salem Museum. Follow Front Street, which will turn into Charter Street…

The Old Burying Point Cemetery is the second oldest English graveyard in Massachusetts. This Cemetery has a few remarkable residents including one Mayflower passenger, architect Samuel McIntire, and Witch Trials Judge John Hathorne (great grandfather to Nathaniel Hawthorne).

Behind the cemetery on Liberty Street is the Salem Witch Trials Memorial. Dedicated in 1992 by Nobel laureate Eli Wiesel, pause to pay respects to the 20 innocent people executed during the Witch Trials of 1692.

From the Memorial, follow the Heritage Trail down Liberty Street past the Salem Wax Museum and Witch Village, turning left onto Derby Street. You will pass shops, restaurants, and the New England Pirate Museum on your way to the waterfront, where the Red Line turns right and loops through the shops and restaurants of Pickering Wharf.

On the eastern side Pickering Wharf, there is a plaque remembering the Frigate ESSEX, which was constructed on Winter Island. She sailed from Salem in 1799 to serve in the Barbary Wars and the War of 1812. Her story was “epic in Naval history.”

Back on Derby Street, turn right toward the Salem Maritime National Historical Site, where historic buildings, wharves, and the reconstructed tall ship FRIENDSHIP* tell the stories of the sailors, Revolutionary War privateers, and merchants who brought the riches of the world to America.

 

 

Continue down Derby Street to Ye Olde Pepper Companie, a candy store noted for its Gibralters and Blackjacks, two of the first commercially produced candies in America. Across Derby Street you will find…

New England’s oldest wooden mansion, the House of the Seven Gables, which was made famous by the novel by Nathaniel Hawthorne it inspired. Today it is part of its own National Historic District, comprised of the Turner-Ingersoll Mansion, Hooper-Hathaway House, Hawthorne’s birthplace, and the seaside gardens.

From here the Heritage Trail continues two blocks to Blaney Street and Salem Wharf, where the Salem Ferry to Boston docks. Reverse direction, and return from the waterfront via the path that cuts through the National Park between the brick Derby House and the yellow Hawkes House, passing the 17th-century Narbonne House onto Essex Street.

Turn left on Essex Street and walk to Hawthorne Boulevard, turning right at the corner by the Hawthorne HotelRecognized as a Historic Hotel of America, the Hawthorne was built by public subscription in 1925.

Adjacent to the Hawthorne Hotel is Salem Common, which was established as a public grazing land in the 17th-century. In the 18th-century it was used as a training ground for the militia, and was the location of the first muster of the American National Guard.

Across from the northwest corner of Salem Common is the statue of Roger Conant. Conant founded Salem in 1626 for the Dorchester Company from England. Behind the Conant statue in an 1845 stone building that was once the Second Church Unitarian, is the Salem Witch Museum.

Turning back toward Essex Street, the Red Line turns right and returns to the tour’s beginning at the Salem Regional Visitor Center. This last block is significant however, as it includes Crow Haven Corner, which is thought to be the first witch shop in America, on the left, and several significant buildings on the Peabody Essex Museum campus on the right.

However you choose to follow Salem’s Heritage Trail, the three loops of Red Line have four centuries of stories to tell and dozens of sites to visit along the way.

*The FRIENDSHIP is currently undergoing a refurbishment in drydock in Gloucester, Massachusetts. She will return to Salem later this year.

McIntire Historic District Walking Tour

This informative and entertaining 90 minute walk will cover the other half of the Mcintire Historic District, significant structures and styles to be found there; restoration and preservation efforts; and social history.

The tour begins at 11:00 a.m. Admission $20. Reservations required. Please use email Culturecorner@gmail.com to reserve. If not possible then call or text  978.979.5907.

McIntire Historic District Walking Tour with Jim McAllister

This informative and entertaining 90-minute walk will cover the creation the original Chestnut Street Historic District and its subsequent expansion; significant structures and styles; restoration and preservation efforts; and social history.

Tour departs at 11:00 a.m. Admission $20. Reservations required. Please use email Culturecorner@gmail.com to reserve. If not possible then call or text  978.979.5907.

The Romance of Food Tour

Join Salem Food Tours on this special romantic stroll on the full moon, $32pp, includes a wine, cheese, sweet/chocolate and spice tasting (renowned aphrodisiacs), information on food and romance throughout the ages, and more!

Tickets are available at the link below.

5 Ways to Stay Fit in Salem, MA

Is staying fit part of your New Year’s resolution? A true walking city filled with fresh local food and a variety of ways to get moving, Salem is a great place to stay fit in the new year:

Cycling at any speed. You’ll find lycra-clad cyclists racing around Salem Common reaching speeds of 35-45 mph at the Witches Cup Criterium Race each August. During the rest of the year, however, we take a slightly slower pace. A bike-friendly community, “sharrows” are painted on many Salem streets to encourage the sharing of roads by automobile and cycle traffic.

Eat local. Pick up locally grown produce, local eggs, and fresh baked goods at the Salem Farmers’ Market, Thursday afternoons June through October and Salem’s Winter Market on select dates in November and December. During the warmer months you’ll find the Salem Farmers’ Market in Derby Square, and during the Winter Market events you’ll need to head indoors to the Museum Place Mall. Milk and Honey Green Grocer, located on Church Street, is another great place to shop for locally sourced foods to keep you healthy all year long. Looking for more local options? Consider visiting even more shops and restaurants (while also learning about Salem’s spice trade history) with Salem Food Tours.

Run it out. In 2012, the Road Runners Club of America, the oldest and largest distance running organization in the United States, designated Salem as a Runner-Friendly Community. This designation means that Salem is an environment in which organizations and businesses work together to promote running as healthy exercise and sport. Salem hosts a number of races annually. Check out the Wicked Frosty Four, a four mile race that takes place annually on New Year’s Day and benefits scholarship funds for local high school students. In October, Salem hosts the Devil’s Chase 6.66 Miler event which brings out thousands of pitchfork carrying runners each year.

Salem, MA, Ropes MansionS-T-R-E-T-C-H out your muscles doing yoga, which during the warmer months is offered outdoors in the garden by the Ropes Mansion, or get in a work out at the Salem YMCA. The YMCA is also close to opening an all-new yoga studio, perfect for getting in some exercise, stress relief, and relaxation after a busy day around town. Day passes and drop-in rates are available through the YMCA to keep you moving all year regardless of the weather.

Take a walk. Salem prides itself on being a walkable city. Not quite sure where to walk? Go for a stroll down Derby Wharf. This scenic walk winds past the Friendship of Salem, the Salem Maritime National Historic Site, and the Derby Wharf Light Station. For a shorter walk, wander through the Essex Street Pedestrian Mall and Artists’ Row, which offers free public workshops from Memorial Day Weekend to Halloween. You’ll also pass by Old Town Hall, which houses Cry Innocent and the Spirit of Salem Film, and Derby Square which is home to the seasonal Farmers’ Market. Whether you find yourself speed-walking around Salem Common, strolling Chestnut Street, or walking the trails of Salem Woods, we hope you will get out there and explore. (And if you need help getting started, check out this Salem guide from WalkBoston.org!)

Notch Sunday Series 5K/10K

Join Notch Brewing for a 5k or 10k run (your choice!) that will start and end at the Notch Tap Room. This isn’t a race, rather, it’s a chance for our lovely Team Notch Runners to get together and do what they do best: Run and Drink Beer. This is a free event and we will provide space in the Tap Room to drop bags and gear while you enjoy the run. We also have free parking! The runs start promptly at 11:30 so show up a bit before that to get ready. Cheers from your friends at Notch Brewing!

Salem Food Tour

Salem Food Tours

Take a guided stroll of Salem’s culinary scene while learning about early colonial dinners, local history and culture, and Salem’s illustrious maritime spice trades with Salem Food Tours. Tickets ($54 per person) may be purchased online at SalemFoodTours.com.

 

Celebrating History & Nature in Greenlawn Cemetery

Salem’s Greenlawn Cemetery, founded in 1807, was influenced by the 19th-century rural cemetery movement. Centered on a High Victorian Gothic chapel built in 1894, Greenlawn features an imposing Civil War veterans monument, two ponds and more than 1,200 trees from all over the world. Over 100 different birds have been sighted in Greenlawn. Our tour will highlight graves of notable Salem citizens, exotic trees, and the ongoing restoration of the Dickson Chapel. Whether drawn by nature or history, Greenlawn Cemetery is a wonderful place to walk, learn, reflect and rest. Please join us to find out more about this historic treasure in Salem, MA

Please meet at the Dickson Memorial Chapel. Just inside the Orne Street gate, to the left & behind of the office. Parking is permitted on Orne street and in the Cemetery.

 

Salt Marsh in the City

Join us for a “walk and talk” at a beautiful and productive salt marsh on the edge of Salem State University. Salt marshes, which flood and drain daily, provide habitat for many species of plant, bird and marine life; breeding grounds for shellfish and fin fish; they improve water quality by filtering water; and they protect shorelines. As we walk around the marsh, we’ll talk about the plants, fish, birds, insects that live in the marsh, the role of the marsh in our marine ecosystem and the history of this marsh, which has been restored from an industrial dumping ground.

Light walking for less than 1/2 mile on a paved and hardpacked walking path. Anyone interested in going onto the marsh should wear closed toed shoes that can get wet or muddy.

Salem.org